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Bertram Dickson

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Bertram Dickson (1873-1913). Early aviator.

1910 Gained his Aviators Certificate in France

1910 June 6th. Distance record for two hours in a Henry Farman biplane.

1910. October 3rd. The first mid-air collision takes place near Milan. Both pilots, Bertram Dickson and Rene Thomas, survive, but Bertram is badly injured.

1911 Captain Bertram Dickson, the first British military officer to fly, also correctly prophesied the military use of aircraft. He predicted aircraft would first be used for reconnaissance, but this would develop into each side trying to "hinder or prevent the enemy from obtaining information", which would eventually turn into a battle for control of the skies.

The steeply sloping Cnoc na Bhain burial ground, one of Scotland's most beautiful graveyards, contains a memorial to the pioneer aviator, Captain Bertram Dickson. The grave records that he was a Captain in the Royal Regiment of Artillery; that he was a soldier, aviator and explorer; that he was born in Edinburgh on 21 December 1873; and that he died at Lochrosque Castle on 29 September 1913


1913 Obituary.[1]

The death is announced to-day at Lochrosque Castle, Ross-shire, of Captain Bertram Dickson, Royal Artillery, the (first) British officer to fly an aeroplane at army manoeuvres. His death occurred on the anniversary of the day on which he was terribly injured at the Milan aviation meeting three years ago.

The story of this accident - a collision in mid-air - is one of the most thrilling in the history of aeronautics. Captain Dickson and M. Thomas were both flying at considerable height, when the two machines crashed into each other. Both fell headlong to earth, and the two pilots were injured for life.

The blame for the collision was fixed by the Paris Courts on Captain Dickson, who last year was ordered to pay damages to Thomas, and to the Antoinette Aeroplane Company.

Captain Dickson never recovered from the effects of tho accident, and had been a confirmed invalid since that day. He said afterwards that he did not remember anything after the accident until he was brought to London many weeks afterwards.

Before taking up aviation. Captain Dickson had a distinguished career the Army.


See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. Yorkshire Evening Post - Tuesday 30 September 1913