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British Industrial History

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Charles Wetherell Wardle

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Charles Wetherell Wardle (1821-1888) of Manning, Wardle and Co of Leeds

1821 Born at Rothwell, Yorkshire

1856 of the Railway Foundry, Leeds

1861 Living at 2 Park Square, Leeds (age 41 born Rothwell, Yorkshire), Engineer. With wife Anne Elizabeth (age 45 born Beeston) and children Adelaide Eliza (age 18), Alice Mary (age 16), Fanny Maria (age 15), Clara (age 12), Edwin (age 11), Harriet Emily (age 8). Also Maria Jane Leather (age 43 born Gildersome), his sister. One servant. [1]

1861 Reads paper at Institution of Mechanical Engineers on the application of the Giffard's injectoras an elevator for the drainage of pit workings [2]

1861 His daughter Adelaide Eliza marries Charles Horace Sanderson. He is C.E. (Civil Engineer) [3]

1872 At trial of Fell Railway at Whitby [4]

1881 Living at Linton Springs, Yorkshire (age 66 both Rothwell), J.P. Locomotive Engine Builder 390 Workmen. With wife Ann Eliza (age 60 born Beeston Park) and son Edwin (age 31), Locomotive Engine Builder and Alica Maud Sanderson (age 16), his granddaughter. Also two visitors and eight servants. [5]

1888 July 3rd. Died aged 67. [6]

1888 Will Mentions widow Anne Eliza, daughters Alice Mary Piccoli, Adelaide Eliza Sanderson, Fanny Maria Smith, Clara Richardson, Harriet Emily Wardle and his son Edwin. [7]


1888 Obituary [8]

CHARLES WETHERELL WARDLE, senior partner in the firm of Messrs. Manning Wardle and Co., Boyne Engine Works, Leeds, was the son of as former vicar of Beeston near Leeds, and was born at Bothwell, near Leeds, on 21st January 1821.

He learnt his profession under Matthew Murray, who constructed some of the earliest locomotives that were commercially successful, and whose inventions contributed in no small degree to the general prosperity of the flax trade.

After completing his apprenticeship he went to the Milton Iron Works as improver, and later to Messrs. E. B. Wilson and Co., Railway Foundry, Leeds, as general manager, eventually becoming chief engineer and outdoor representative. At that time the Railway Foundry was one of the largest locomotive and general engineering works in the country; and being thus brought into frequent contact with the locomotive superintendents and directors of most of the large railways both in this country and on the continent, he became well known in the railway world.

On the closing of the Railway Foundry in 1858, he entered into partnership with others who had held important positions there, and commenced the Boyne Engine Works on a portion of the same site.

In about fifteen years, owing to withdrawal or death of the other partners, the business devolved wholly upon himself and his son.

In 1868 he was engaged by the government in valuing the railways in Ireland.

His death took place at his residence, Linton Spring, Wetherby, on 3rd July 1888, in the sixty-eighth year of his age.

He became a Member of this Institution in 1856, and in 1861 gave a paper on an application of Giffard's injector as an elevator for the drainage of a portion of the pit workings at Kippax Colliery near Leeds (Proceedings 1861, page 220).



See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. 1861 Census
  2. Birmingham Daily Post, Thursday, November 14, 1861
  3. The Bradford Observer, Thursday, April 24, 1862
  4. The Leeds Mercury, Saturday, June 22, 1872
  5. 1881 Census
  6. The York Herald, Thursday, July 05, 1888
  7. The Morning Post, Friday, October 19, 1888
  8. 1888 Institution of Mechanical Engineers: Obituaries