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Daniel Layborn

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Daniel Layborn (1844-1910), principal of Daniel Layborn and Co

of Caine and Layborn, Dutton Street, Liverpool.


1910 Obituary [1]

DANIEL LAYBORN was born at Beverley on 20th February 1844.

He served an apprenticeship with Messrs. Forresters, Vauxhall Foundry, Liverpool, and went to Rangoon in 1866 for Messrs. Gladstone, Wyllie and Co., being associated with the erection of the principal rice and cotton mills there.

In 1877 he was appointed Government Engineer Surveyor at Rangoon, which post he held until his return to Liverpool in 1880, when he joined in partnership with his cousin, Mr. Nathaniel Caine, in the iron and tin-plate business.

In 1889 the title of the firm was altered to Layborn, Patterson and Co., and two years later it became Daniel Layborn and Co., of which he was principal until his death.

For twenty-five years he had been a Member of the Liverpool Chamber of Commerce, and in 1905-6 was Chairman of the Iron and General Metal Trades Section of it.

His death took place at Penybont, Radnorshire, while on a holiday, on 6th October 1910, in his sixty-seventh year.

He became a Member of this Institution in 1870.


1910 Obituary [2]

DANIEL LAYBORN died on October 6, 1910, at Greenway Manor, Penybont Station, Radnorshire, at the age of sixty-six. He was principal of the firm of Daniel Layborn & Co., Ltd., of Liverpool and Manchester. For the last twenty-five years he had been a member of the committee of the Iron and General Metal Trades Section of the Incorporated Chamber of Commerce of Liverpool, and in 1905 acted as chairman of the Section.

He was elected a member of the Iron and Steel Institute in 1894.


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