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Eliot Howard

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Eliot Howard (1842-1927) of Hayward Tyler and Co

1864 Eliot Howard, Hayward Tyler and Co, Engineers, Upper Whitecross Street, London.[1]

1927 October 8th. Died.[2]


1927 Obituary [3]

ELIOT HOWARD was, at the time of his death on 8th October 1927, the oldest surviving Member of the Institution.

He was born in 1842 and served his apprenticeship at the Millwall Ironworks at the time they were building H.M.S. "Northumberland" and rolling the plates for H.M.S. "Warrior," the first ironclads of the British Navy.

In 1863 he joined his brother, the late Mr. R. L. Howard, as partner in the firm of Hayward-Tyler and Company and they carried on the business of hydraulic engineers and the manufacture of mineral-water machinery.

It was due to Mr. Howard's initiative that in 1869 the firm undertook the manufacture of the "Universal" steam-pumps, one of the earliest single-cylinder steam-pumps to be manufactured in Europe. Later a Duplex type, specially adapted for cargo oil and other marine purposes, was developed.

In 1871 large works were built at Luton, and the original London works were eventually closed in 1904.

In 1905 the company was converted into a private limited liability company of which Mr. Howard was one of the first directors.

He became chairman in 1916 and retained this position until the time of his death.

In early days he was a keen mountaineer, but a shooting accident in 1869 caused him to lose the sight of one eye.

Mr. Howard became a Member of the institution in 1864.



1927 Obituary[4]

THE LATE MR. ELIOT HOWARD.

We regret to note the death, on October 8 last, of Mr. Eliot Howard, for many years Chairman of Messrs. Hayward-Tyler and Company, Limited, engineers, of 99, Queen Victoria-street, London, E.C.4, and of Luton, Beds. A son of the late Mr. Robert Howard, F.C.S., Mr. Eliot Howard was born in 1842, and received his early education at Grove House School, Tottenham. He became an engineering apprentice at the Millwall Ironworks, and, during his term of training, was employed on work in connection with the building of H.M.SS. Northumberland and Warrior, the first two ironclads of the British Navy. His long connection with Messrs. Hayward-Tyler and Company began in 1863, when he joined his brother, the late Mr. R. L. Howard, as a partner in that concern. Originally established in 1815 at Milton-street, in the City of London, the works of the company were transferred to Whitecross-street in 1839, where they stood when Mr. Eliot Howard joined the firm. The brothers, between them, developed the business, which comprised hydraulic engineering and the manufacture of mineral-water machinery, two of their specialities being hydraulic presses and continuous-process soda-water machines, as designed by Joseph Bramah.

It was due to Mr. Eliot Howard’s initiative that, in 1869, the firm undertook the manufacture of the Universal steam pump, one of the earliest singlecylinder steam pumps to be manufactured in Europe. Later, the manufacture of the Duplex type of pump was undertaken, which type has since been specially adapted for cargo oil and other marine purposes, and also for land work in connection with large and small oil installations at home and abroad. In 1871 it was found impossible to develop further the plant at Whitecross-street. Large works were consequently constructed and fitted out at Luton, and the manufacturing activities of the firm were ‘gradually transferred to the new premises. The London works were finally closed in 1904. In the following year, the firm of Messrs. Hayward-Tyler and Company was converted into a private limited-liability company, and Mr. Eliot Howard became one of the first directors. He became Chairman in 1916, and retained this position until his death. He was elected a member of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers as long ago as 1864, and had, for some years past, been the doyen of the Institution. He was a Justice of the Peace and had held the office of Deputy-Lieutenant of the County of Essex.


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