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British Industrial History

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Ernest Talbot

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Ernest Talbot (1857-1904) of Hopkinson and Talbot


1905 Obituary [1]

ERNEST TALBOT was born at Smethwick on the 30th of September, 1857, and educated at King Edward's Grammar School, Birmingham.

He obtained his engineering training at the lighthouse works of Messrs. Chance Brothers & Co., under the late Dr. John Hopkinson, and in 1880, when the latter commenced private practice in Westminster, Mr. Talbot became his principal assistant, being employed in connection with various works, chiefly installations of electric lighting and electric traction, upon which Dr. Hopkinson was engaged.

On the death of his chief in 1898, Mr. Talbot entered into partnership with Messrs. Charles and Bertram Hopkinson, to carry on the consulting practice established by Dr. Hopkinson, and between 1898 and 1903, when the partnership was dissolved by mutual consent, he was consulted by many local authorities and others in connection with electric lighting and electric-traction schemes.

In conjunction with Dr. Hopkinson, he carried out the initial installation of electric tramways in Liverpool, and later he completed the conversion of the Leeds tramways to electric traction.

Mr. Talbot died on the 5th of May, 1904, in his 46th year.

He was elected an Associate of the Institution in 1891, and was transferred to the class of Members in 1899.


1904 Obituary [2]

ERNEST TALBOT, born at Smethwick on the 30th September, 1857, was educated at King Edward's Grammar School, Birmingham, and obtained his engineering training at the lighthouse works of Chance Brothers and Co, under the late Dr. John Hopkinson.

When, in 1880, the latter commenced private practice in Westminster, Ernest Talbot became his principal assistant, being employed in connection with various works, chiefly installations of electric lighting and electric traction, upon which Dr. Hopkinson was engaged.

On the death of his chief in 1898, Mr. Talbot entered into partnership with Messrs. Charles and Bertram Hopkinson, to carry on the consulting practice established by Dr. Hopkinson, and between 1898 and 1903, when the partnership was dissolved by mutual consent, . . . [more]



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