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Francis Carr Marshall

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Francis Carr Marshall (1831-1903) of R. and W. Hawthorn, Leslie and Co

1865 Francis Carr Marshall, Manager, Palmer's Engine Works, Jarrow, near Gateshead.[1]

1866 Birth of son Frank Theodore Marshall

1901 Living at Akinside Lodge, Jesmond: Frances C. Marshall (age 69 born Bedlington), Retired Mechanical Engineer. With his wife Jane A. Marshall (age 69 born Newcastle-upon-Tyne). Two servants.[2]

1903 February 24th. Died age 71.


1903 Obituary [3]

FRANCIS CARR MARSHALL was born at Bedlington, Northumberland, on 25th April 1831, and subsequently removed to Newcastle, where his father was employed at the locomotive works of Messrs. Hawthorn at Forth Banks.

On completing his education at Newcastle he was apprenticed to Messrs. R. and W. Hawthorn as an ordinary engineering apprentice, passing through the shops, and subsequently into the drawing office.

After being employed for some time as a draughtsman at Messrs. Hawthorn's, he became chief draughtsman to the firm of Messrs. Thompson and Boyd, of Newcastle, where he remained until the year 1860, when he took charge of the engine works of Messrs. Palmer Brothers at Jarrow. While at Jarrow the whole of the engine works were remodelled and rebuilt under his regime, and a large amount of important marine engine work, including the engines for some of the largest Atlantic liners of that day were produced from the Jarrow works.

In 1870 he left Jarrow, and, in association with Mr. B. C. Browne (now Sir Benjamin Browne) and others, he purchased the Forth Banks Works of Messrs. R. and W. Hawthorn. In the early "seventies" the firm commenced to do a considerable amount of government work, with the production of which it has in later years been so closely associated. In addition to the government engines, he was responsible for the design of a considerable number of large mercantile engines in the early days of the new firm.

The Works continued to grow and develop until, finally, it was arranged that the whole of the Marine Department should be moved to St. Peter's (where the Boiler Yard already was), and Mr. Marshall designed and constructed the present Marine Engine Works at St. Peter's.

He was prominently associated with the first introduction of the high-speed marine engine for warship work, such as is now commonly in use. One of the earlier sets of machinery of this type, designed by him, was for the cruiser "Esmeralda," built by Messrs. Armstrong, Mitchell and Co., at Walker-on-Tyne. He also designed a number of other similar ships for various governments.

He was associated with the first introduction of the torpedo type of engine into vessels of larger size, some vessels for the Russian Government and the Italian Government, engined by him, being the earliest representatives of the Torpedo Gun-Boat Class.

He was largely instrumental in bringing about the introduction of forced draught on board ships, and designed some of the earlier installations which were effected. His name is also associated with the "Marshall" valve-gear — a single eccentric gear which has been fitted to a very large number of marine engines.

When the firm of Messrs. R. and W. Hawthorn amalgamated with Messrs. Andrew Leslie and Co., Mr. Marshall became managing director of the Engine Works. After the amalgamation, he was responsible for a large amount of high-power engines for vessels built at the Shipyard, in addition to the warship machinery supplied to H.M. dockyards and also to Messrs. Armstrong, Whitworth and Co.

He continued in his position as managing director at St. Peter's Works until 1897, when, owing to failing health, he was obliged to resign his active duties, although he remained upon the Board of Directors of the company for some years after. For the last few years he bad been a confirmed invalid, and had not been able to take any interest in the business.

In 1881 he contributed a Paper to this Institution on "The Progress and Development of the Marine Engine."

His death took place at his residence in Newcastle-on-Tyne on 24th February 1903, in his seventy-second year.

He became a Member of this Institution in 1865, and was a Member of Council from 1882 to 1885, and 1892 to 1896, and a Vice-President in 1896-97.


1903 Obituary [4]

FRANCIS CARR MARSHALL was born at Bedlington, in 1831, and subsequently removed to Newcastle-on-Tyne, where his father was employed at the locomotive works of R. and W. Hawthorn at Forth Banks.

At the age of 14 the subject of this notice entered Messrs. Hawthorn’s works as an ordinary engineering apprentice, passing through the shops, and subsequently into the drawing office. After being employed for some time as a draughtsman at Forth Banks, he became Chief Draughtsman to the firm of Thompson and Boyd, of Newcastle, where he remained until the year 1860, when he was appointed Manager of the engine works of Palmer Brothers, at Jarrow. While at Jarrow, the whole of the engine factory was re-modelled and rebuilt under Mr. Marshall’s direction, and a large amount of marine-engine work was turned out, including the engines for some of the largest Atlantic liners of that day.

In 1870 Mr. Marshall left Jarrow, and, in association with Mr. (now Sir Benjamin) Browne and others, he purchased the Forth Banks Works of Messrs. R. and W. Hawthorn. In the early 'seventies' the firm commenced to do a considerable amount of Government work, with the production of which it has in later years been closely associated.

In addition to the Government engines, Mr. Marshall was responsible for the design of a considerable number of large mercantile engines in the early days of the new firm. The works continued to grow and develop until finally it was arranged that the whole of the Marine Department should be moved to St. Peter’s, where the boiler yard already was, and Mr. Marshall designed and constructed the present marine-engine works at St. Peter’s.

He was prominently associated with the introduction of the high-speed marine-engine for warship work, such as is now commonly in use. In association with Armstrong, Mitchell and Co, he designed and constructed the machinery for small swift cruisers built in 1881-83 for China and Chile. These were followed by the larger cruisers 'Esmeralda' for Chile, 'Giovanni Bausan' for Italy, and 'Naniwa' and 'Takachibo' for Japan, built in 1883-85.

Mr. Marshall was also instrumental in introducing the torpedo boat type of engine and boiler into vessels of larger size, engined by him for the Russian Government and the Italian Government, being the earliest representatives of th0 torpedo gun-boat class. He was also intimately connected with the introduction of forced draught on board ship.

When the firm of R. and W. Hawthorn amalgamated with Andrew Leslie and Co, Mr. Marshall became Managing Director of the engine works. After the amalgamation, he was responsible for a large amount of high-power engines for vessels built at the shipyard, in addition to the warship machinery supplied to His Majesty’s dockyards and also to the Armstrong Company.

He continued to hold the post of Managing Director at St. Peter’s until the year 1897, when, owing to failing health, he was obliged to resign active duties, although he remained on the Board of Directors of the Company. For the last few years, however, he was a confirmed invalid, and was not able to take any interest in the business.

He died at his residence, Akenside Lodge, Newcastle-on-Tyne, of the 24th February, 1903. Mr. Marshal1 was elected a Member of the Institution on the 9th January, 1866.


1903 Obituary [5]

FRANCIS CARR MARSHALL, who was for many years a prominent engineer on Tyneside, died at Newcastle-on-Tyne on February 24, 1903. He began his engineering career in 1845 as apprentice to R. & W. Hawthorne, when marine engineering was a small industry in the North, and the Hawthornes were locomotive engineers of some eminence. He was afterwards manager of the engine works department of Palmer's at Jarrow, at a time when the Tyne was feeling the impulse in shipbuilding and marine engineering given to it by the application of steam to coal vessels. His career was, indeed, contemporary with the development of marine engineering on the Tyne.

Later he joined Sir B. C. Browne and others in the purchase of the works of R. & W. Hawthorne. He was a member of the Institution of Civil Engineers, and of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, and was a warm supporter of the North-East Coast Institution of Engineers and Shipbuilders.

He was elected a member of the Iron and Steel Institute in 1889.


1903 Obituary [6].[7]



1903 Obituary [8]



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