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British Industrial History

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George Edwin Fuller

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George Edwin Fuller (1860-1916)


1916 Obituary [1]

GEORGE EDWIN FULLER was born at Chatham on 8th June 1860.

After receiving a general education at a local school, he began in 1874 a seven years' apprenticeship in H.M. Dockyard, Chatham, and during that period he attended Science and Art Classes, obtaining various certificates for proficiency.

In March 1881 he became a locomotive erector in the works of the London, Chatham and Dover Railway, and was appointed chargeman erector in February 1887.

In December 1889 he went to South Africa, and worked in the shops of the Cape Government Railway for nearly three years, when he returned to England and rejoined the London, Chatham and Dover Railway.

Two years later he was appointed running-shed foreman at the Battersea Works, and in 1900 he was transferred to Chatham, where he acted as district locomotive foreman at the New Brompton Works.

In June 1903 he received the appointment of locomotive superintendent of the Gold Coast Railway, and after three years in this position he was appointed locomotive and traffic superintendent of the Benguella Railway, Lobita Bay.

In August 1910 he became locomotive superintendent of the Chilian Longitudinal Railway, and two years later was appointed chief locomotive superintendent of the Bolivar Railway, Venezuela. He returned to England in 1914 and was making a holiday tour in Germany when war broke out.

The treatment he received during his internment undermined his health, and on his release he went on a voyage, but his death took place at sea from heart failure on 3rd May 1916, in his fifty-sixth year.

He was elected an Associate Member of this Institution in 1909.



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