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British Industrial History

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Henry Clements

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Henry Clements (c1854-1926), secretary of the Welsh Plate and Sheet Manufacturers' Association

c1854 Born

1926 4th July Died at his home in Swansea.


1926 Obituary

'A notable figure in the South Wales tin-plate industry died at his home in Swansea on Sunday last in Mr Henry Clements, who was the secretary of the Welsh Plate and Sheet Manufacturers Association. Mr Clements was seventy-two years of age and was a native of Llanelly. He was for several years general manager of the Beaufort Tin-plate Works at Morristown and was a member of the Executive Committee of the old Tin-plate Manufacturers' Association. Over thirty years ago he retired from active participation in tin-plate production and was appointed as secretary of the employers' organisation. This was at a very critical period in the history of the tin-plate trade, and it has been largely due to his skill in negotiation and his knowledge of men, coupled with his mastery of all details connected with the industry, that the conditions in South Wales have been so free from serious trouble.

Mr Clements played a very considerable part in the establishment of the Joint Industrial Council which formed the model on which the Whitley Councils were moulded and which contributed still further to the foundation of conciliation and goodwill which has prevailed between employers and workmen. Whereas in 1908 there were only thirty-five works in the organisation, there are now seventy-eight, which represents 99 per cent of the trade. A nephew of the deceased, Mr H. C. Thomas, is the assistant secretary of the Welsh Plate and Sheet Manufacturers' Association.'[1]

See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. The Engineer 1926/07/09