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Henry John Card Anderson

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Henry John Card Anderson (1835-1891)

of Easton and Anderson

1835 Born in Wiltshire, son of Henry Anderson, perfumier, and his wife Martha[1]


1891 Obituary [2]

HENRY JOHN CARD ANDERSON was born at Salisbury on 2nd March 1835.

At the age of sixteen, with a view to the engineering profession, he was articled for three years to Mr. F. Rumble.

On the completion of his pupilage he became a draughtsman in the office of Mr. Thomas Page, by whom he was engaged on the works of the new Westminster Bridge.

He was next employed by Mr. Joseph Cubitt on the Rochester Bridge works of the East Kent Railway.

In 1859 be went to Bombay to occupy a post on the Great Indian Peninsula Railway; but a severe sunstroke necessitated his return in the following year.

Afterwards he was employed as resident engineer for Mr. Cubitt and Mr. W. M. Brydone on the Aylesbury and Buckingham, the March and Spalding, and the Stamford and Gibson railways. After the completion of the works on these lines he entered the service of Messrs. Easton Amos and Anderson, and acted as resident engineer in the construction of the Lade Bank pumping station of the River Witham drainage.

In 1868 he was similarly employed during the building of the iron pier at Grays, Essex, for the Grays Chalk Quarries Company; and later in the same year went to Egypt to erect the Boulac paper mills for Messrs. Easton. During 1870-72 he built the three large sugar factories of Aba, Beni Mazar, and Salagoss, and superintended their working until 1876, when he constructed the Gizeh pumping station for supplying water to the palaces and gardens in that suburb of Cairo.

Till 1879 he was employed in the management of the Khedive's sugar factories, and during part of that time acted as resident agent in England. In that year he became chief assistant to Mr. Edward Easton, and his representative in Egypt, and in 1880 became his partner, and carried out many large works connected with water supply, including the large pumping station at Katatbeh.

The partnership being dissolved in 1882, he then formed a small company, which entered into contracts with the Egyptian government for cleaning, widening, and deepening by mechanical means the irrigating and draining canals of the Delta. His knowledge of the country, and of the ways and language of the people, enabled him to aid materially in suppressing forced labour, and in performing the important work of maintaining the Delta canals by the means ordinarily employed in other countries.

His health, having become enfeebled by sunstroke and long exposure in a tropical country, gradually broke down, and he died on 25th March 1891, at the age of fifty-six.

He became a Member of this Institution in 1876.


1891 Obituary [3]

HENRY JOHN CARD ANDERSON, the only son who survived infancy of Mr. Henry Anderson of Salisbury, was born on the 2nd of March, 1835. He was originally intended for the law, but his own wishes and inclinations being greatly in favour of the engineering profession, he was, at the age of sixteen, articled for three years to the late Mr. Frederick Rumble.

Afterwards, at the end of his pupilage, he became a draughtsman in the office of the late Thomas Page, and was engaged, among other matters, on the works of New Westminster Bridge.

He next held an appointment on the East Kent Railway under Joseph Cubitt, being employed on the Rochester Bridge works.

In October, 1859, he left England for Bombay to take up a three years’ appointment on the Great Indian Peninsula Railway; but a severe sunstroke necessitated his return in the following year.

He was afterwards employed as Resident Engineer on various railway works for Mr. Cubitt and W. M. Brydone, among them the Aylesbury and Buckingham, the March and Spalding, and the Stamford and Gibson lines.

Soon after the completion of these works he entered the service of Easton, Amos and Anderson, and acted as Resident Engineer in the construction of the Lade Bank Pumping-station, 'River Witham Drainage.'

In 1868 he was similarly employed during the building of the iron pier at Grays, Essex, for the Grays Chalk Quarries Company, and in October of the same year went to Egypt to erect the Boulac Paper-mills, which Messrs. Easton were constructing for the late Khedive.

During the years 1870-72, he was fully engaged in building the great sugar-factories of Aba, Beni Mazar, and Salagoss, and superintending their working till 1876, when he constructed the Gizeh Pumping-station, designed to supply the palaces and gardens in that suburb of Cairo with water. . . . [more]



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