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British Industrial History

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Henry Joseph Garnett

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Henry Joseph Garnett (c1872-1948) of the Telegraph Construction and Maintenance Co

1930 Patent. Improvements in the manufacture of magnetic alloys. Willoughby Statham Smith, Henry Joseph Garnett, Walter Frederick Randall, October 22, 1930: GB336948-A

1930 Patent. Improvements in the manufacture of signalling conductors. Willoughby Statham Smith, Walter Frederick Randall, Frank Leslie Smith, November 21, 1930: GB338565-A

1932 Patent. Improvements in and relating to the refinement of magnetic metals and alloys. Willoughby Statham Smith, Henry Joseph Garnett, Walter Frederick Randall, March 7, 1932: GB368780-A

1933 Patent. Improved magnetic alloys. Willoughby Statham Smith, Henry Joseph Garnett, Walter Frederick Randall, Telegraph Construction And Mai, Deutsch Atlantische Telegraphe, January 23, 1933: GB386682-A

1948 Died

1949 Estate. 'Left £25,358 Mr. Henry Joseph Garnett, of Lymne, Solefields-road, Sevenoaks, formerly works manager of the Telegraph Construction and Maintenance Co. Ltd., who died on December 3 last, aged 76 years, left £25,358 2s. 8d. gross ; £24,986 14s, 1d. net value. (Duty paid, £3.006).'[1]


1948 Obituary [2]

Death of Mr. Henry J. Garnett. THE speed at which telegraph and television cables can be operated to-day owes much to the work of Mr. Henry Joseph Garnett of Lymne. Grassy Lane, Sevenoaks, who died on Friday at Dean Lodge Nursing Home. Sevenoaks. Only two weeks ago he had travelled alone, despite his 76 years, to visit his specialist in London, and until the end was full of plans for the future.

Of Essex yeoman stock — his father combined the Postmastership of Romford, Essex, with farming Mr. Garnett was educated at Dame Own’s School, Islington and he received his technical training from Sylvanus Thompson and others of that era.

His life’s work centered around chemical engineering and metallurgy, and this connection became, in his turn, a leading technical authority on the manufacture of submarine telegraph, telephone and television cables, his contribution to their improvement largely making possible the speed at which these cables can be operated to-day.

IMPORTANT RESEARCH. The radio and allied industries owe much to his pioneer work in the development of high permeability and low loss alloys, and in connection with these he was responsible for introducing into this country the high frequency electric furnace.

He was a founder member of the Society of Chemical Industry and also the Chemical Industry Club; and member of the Royal Institution. The northward spread of London caused him to come to Otford 50 years ago, where he lived until 1922, when he moved to the house he had had built in Grassy Lane.

For many years he was a Special Constable, being awarded the Long Service Medal, and during the late war he was an active air raid warden until advancing years necessitated his giving up the onerous duties.

Keenly interested in the Boy Scout movement, he served as treasurer to the Sevenoaks Association for a number of years, and presented the Garnett Cup to, encourage the study by Scouts of Natural History. Mr. Garnett was essentially a family man and disliked publicity. Of high moral character in a true sense, he was full of a human understanding of all men. His leisure hours were devoted his dog, his garden and his books.


See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. Sevenoaks Chronicle and Kentish Advertiser - Friday 25 February 1949
  2. Sevenoaks Chronicle and Kentish Advertiser - Friday 10 December 1948