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J. Grossmith and Sons

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1892.
1897. Victorian Bouquet
c1900.
October 1903. Florodora.
1910.
1915.
March 1919. Wana-Ranee.
November 1920.
June 1933. Old Cottage Lavender.
December 1933.
Family Tree.
Family Tree.

of Newgate Street, London, EC1; 2-4 Duke's Head Passage; 19-21 Ivy Lane; and 24-27 Paternoster Square, London, EC. Telephone: City 3226-7. Cables: "Grossmith, London". (1929)

Manufacturer of Perfumes, Toiletries and Cosmetics.

1835 Firm established in London.

1841 Had a wholesale premises at 24 Cannon Street, London.

1843 John Lipscomb Grossmith born in Hackney, Greater London in Q1. [1]

c1852 Business moved to 39 Friday Street, London.

1854 Business moved to 85 Newgate Street before moving to Piccadilly.

1867 John (the founder) died and was succeeded by his son John Lipscomb Grossmith, Junior.

1868 John Lipscomb Grossmith married at St Pancras in Q4. [2]

1880 Grossmith introduced a range of oriental-X perfumes which were very successful.

1881 John L. GROSMITH, 1 Melford Villas, Melford Rd, Camberwell, Surrey. Occupation Wholesale Merch Perfurmy. Born in 1844 at Kingsland, Middlesex. Married. [3]

1884 J. Grossmith, Son and Co, fancy soap maker, of 85 Newgate Street and Dowgate Dock, London EC. [4]

1899 J. Grossmith, Son and Co, perfumers of 29 Newgate Street, London. [5]

1919 The company was reformed as a private limited company under the chairmanship of Stanley Grossmith.

1929 Listed Exhibitor. Manufacturers of Perfumes, Fine Soaps, and Toilet Requisites of all descriptions. (Stand No. M.53) [6]


A member of the family writes:

Established in London in 1835 by John Grossmith, a descendant of farmers living in the Bishops Waltham area since around 1688. His mother was Mary Lipscomb, daughter of farmers living in Upham, the next village.

John Grossmith was married to Lucy Eliza Whitaker. His son, John Lipscomb Grossmith, was trained as a perfumer in Grasse (in France, considered as the world's capital of perfume) and ran the business until 1919, innovating and establishing a wide range of classic English perfumes, including Hasu-no-Hana, Phũl-Nãnã and Shem-el-Nessim. A number of the fragrances were sold in Baccarat flacons.

Grossmith enjoyed Royal patronage in the late 1800s and early 1900s and held royal warrants from Queen Alexandra as well as from the royal courts of Greece and Spain. Grossmith formulated perfume for Queen Victoria’s Jubilee (Victorian Bouquet), for the accession of King Edward VII (Regal) and for the engagement of the Duke of York and Princess May (Betrothal) who later became King George V and Queen Mary.

John Lipscomb Grossmith’s son, Stanley, also Grasse-trained, ran the business until his untimely death (aged 45) in 1924.

There are plans to re-commence business using the original formulations.


Notes:

  • Scent bottle with name Johann Grossmith from Cologne seen, but no connection with this family has been established.
  • William Grossmith of Reading is listed as a perfumer but no connection with this family established.

See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. BMD Records
  2. BMD Records
  3. 1881 Census.
  4. Business Directory of London, 1884
  5. Post Office London Directory, 1899.
  6. 1929 British Industries Fair p72
  • [1] Perfume Intelligence - The Encyclopaedia of Perfume