Grace's Guide

British Industrial History

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 133,111 pages of information and 210,773 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

James Martin (1821-1899)

From Graces Guide

Jump to: navigation, search

The Hon. James Martin (1821-1899)

1889 Joined I Mech E

of Messrs. James Martin and Co., Phoenix Foundry, Gawler, South Australia. Maker of large hauling engines for mines, bridge and boiler work, and locomotives for colonial railways.



1900 Obituary [1]

The Hon. JAMES MARTIN was born in 1821, at the village of Foundry, in the parish of Stithians, Cornwall.

He received little schooling, and at an early ago had to try to earn his own livelihood. After a little experience he went to Truro, and worked for a millwright. He was next employed at the Tresavean mine, Gwennap, and while there was connected with the adoption of the first man-engine used in England. This contrivance was invented by the engineer of the mine, and young Martin was deputed to make the model of it; that model is now in the Polytechnic Hall at Falmouth.

Subsequently he gained experience in a woollen factory at Ponsanooth, near Penryn, where be had to do all kinds of work. His determination to overcome obstacles was the secret of much of his success in after life. Becoming a victim to asthma, he determined to settle in a warmer climate, and South Australia was his choice.

He arrival in that colony in 1847, and settled in Gawler as a wheelwright. The site of his workshop is now a very small portion of the area occupied by Messrs. Martin and Co.'s works, which, grown out of that small beginning, now cover eighteen acres. He began operations with one man, and at the time of his death was employing about 700.

As agriculture extended, he took up the manufacture of reaping machines and other agricultural implements, and during the last ten years built for the South Australian Government about 150 locomotives, in addition to which the firm have built locomotives for Western Australia and Tasmania. Among the numerous mines to which they have supplied machinery, batteries, &c., are the well-known Broken Hill Proprietary, Lake View Consols, Golden Horseshoe, &c. Notwithstanding the great demand which his extending business made upon his attention, he identified himself with every important local movement.

He was Mayor of Gawler for eight years; and was first elected to a seat in the Routh Australian Parliament in 1865, which he resigned three years later, when he took a trip to this country. In 1885 he was elected a member of the Legislative Council, retaining the seat until the time of his decease.

Latterly he had suffered from chest trouble, which gradually became worse, and his death took place at his residence in Gaoler, on 27th December 1899, in his seventy-ninth year.

He became a Member of this Institution in 1889.


1900 Obituary [2]

"...December 27th, 1899, of the Hon. James Martin. Mr. Martin was born in the Year 1821. His birthplace was the village of Foundry, in the parish of Stithians, Cornwall. He received little schooling, and at an early age had to try to earn his own livelihood. After a little experience be went to Truro and worked for a millwright.

He was next employed at the Tresavene mine, and while there was connected with the adoption of the first manengine used in England. The contrivance was invented by the engineer or tho mine, and young Martin was deputed to make the model of it - that model is now in the Polytechnic Hall at Falmouth.

Subsequently he gained experience in a woollen factory at..."More.





See Also

Loading...

Sources of Information