Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

Registered UK Charity (No. 115342)

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

John Levick (1840-1915)

From Graces Guide

John Levick (c1840-1915) of the company John Levick

c1840 Born the son of John Levick, a Metal Spinner.

1851 Living at 97 Upper Tower Street, Birmingham: John Levick (age 32 born Sheffield), Metal Spinner. With his wife Ann Levick (age 33 born Web heath, Worcs.) and their six children; John Levick (age 11 born Birmingham); Ann Levick (age 9 born Birmingham); Emma Levick (age 6 born Birmingham); Alfred Levick (age 4 born Birmingham); Sarah J. Levick (age 2 born Birmingham); and Henry Levick (age 3 months born Birmingham)

1863 Married in Aston to Elizabeth Ann Hammond

1911 Living at 24 Livingstone Road, Handsworth, Staffs: John Levick (age 71 born Birmingham), Metal Worker, Railway Sanitary Appliances - Employer. With his wife Elizabeth Ann Levick (age 70 born Stourport). Two servants.[1]


1915 Obituary.[2]

The funeral will take place to-morrow, at Witton Cemetery, of Mr. John Levick, the head of the firm of metal spinners, Alma Street, Aston, who died on Wednesday at his residence, Livingstone House. Birchfield. Mr. Levick, who had been in ill-health for a considerable time, was in his 70th year.

He was a Unionist in politics, but never took part in public work in Birmingham, although on one occasion many years ago he aspired to a seat the old Aston Local Board. Then was elected by a small majority, but a scrutiny of the votes was demanded, and this going against him his opponent was declared the winner.

He was a familiar figure in the district with which his works were associated and was also well known in scientific and musical circles in Birmingham. He was one the oldest members of the Birmingham and Midland Institute, and an enthusiastic member of the Scientific Society. In his early days was a member the History and Microscopical Society, which became the Microscopical and Philosophical Society, and it was owing largely to his energy that the Natural History Society became noted for its researches into natural science.

Mr. Levick studied French at Mason College, and since the establishment of the university he had on many occasions lectured in French to the students. He was also well versed in photography, and an accomplished musician. In has youth he played in the orchestra at the Old Argyll, and was regarded as one of the best piccolo players in the district.


See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. 1911 Census
  2. Birmingham Daily Post - Friday 09 April 1915