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Joseph William Richards

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Joseph William Richards (1864-1921)


1921 Obituary [1]

JOSEPH WILLIAM RICHARDS, Professor of Metallurgy at Lehigh University, died at Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, on October 12, 1921.

He was born in 1864 at Oldbury, England. He entered the United States at an early age, and was graduated from the Central High School of Philadelphia in 1882 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. He entered Lehigh University in the same year, and graduated in 1886 with the degree of Analytical Chemist, being awarded the degree of Master of Science in 1891, and that of Doctor of Philosophy in 1893.

In 1887 he was appointed assistant instructor in metallurgy, and he served continuously from that time to his death, having been Professor of Metallurgy since 1903. He was one of the foremost engineers of America, and had an international reputation in various branches of metallurgical technology. He served on numerous boards, and also as representative of American scientific societies at various International Congresses. He was one of the founders of the American Electrochemical Society; he became its first president, and since 1907 has acted as secretary. He took a prominent part in the publication of Electrochemical Industry, the forerunner of Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering. His important work on "Metallurgical Calculations" has become a standard work, and has a wide circulation in several languages. His other books include a treatise on aluminium and several translations, principal among which is Giolitti's work on "Cementation of Iron and Steel." He also contributed numerous papers to the technical press and scientific societies.

He was a member of the Franklin Institute, and was elected a member of the Iron and Steel Institute in 1904.


1921 Obituary [2]

JOSEPH WILLIAM RICHARDS, A.C., Ph.D., M.A., M.S., Professor of Metallurgy at Lehigh University, died at his home in Bethlehem, Pa., U.S.A., on October 12, 1921. He had only recently returned from a trip to Europe, during the course of which he paid a visit to the Institute of Metals and renewed many old acquaintanceships.

Dr. Richards was born in Oldbury, Staffordshire, on July 28, 1864, and was taken to the United States when very young. He graduated from the Central High School of Philadelphia, Pa., in 1882 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and entered Lehigh University in of that year.

In 1886 he graduated from Lehigh University with the degree of Analytical Chemist, and pursuing post-graduate work at Lehigh University was awarded the degree of Master of Science in 1891, and that of Doctor of Philosophy in 1893. He received the degree of Master of Arts from the Philadelphia Central High School in 1887.

In September of that year, Dr. Richards was appointed assistant instructor in metallurgy and blowpiping at Lehigh University, and he served continuously at the University from that time to his death in the following positions : Instructor in Metallurgy, Mineralogy, and Blowpiping, 1890-1897 ; Assistant Professor, 1897- 1903 ; Professor of Metallurgy, 1903-1921. As a metallurgical engineer of international reputation, his services were widely sought in chemical and metallurgical cases. He was a member of the U.S. Assay Commission, 1897 ; Representative of the Franklin Institute to the International Geological Congress held in Russia in 1897 ; Member of the Jury of Awards, Department of Chemistry, of the National Export Exhibition, Philadelphia, in. 1899 ; Member of the Jury of Awards and Chairman of the Metallurgical Subjury, Panama-Pacific International Exposition, 1915 ; Member of the U.S. Naval Consulting Board, 1915-1918. He was a charter member of the American Electrochemical Society, its first President 1902 and 1903, and its Secretary since 1907.

He was a member of the Franklin Institute, Philadelphia, President of the Chemical Section, 1897, 1899, and Professor of Electrochemistry of the Institute, 1907-1910. He was a member of the Faraday Society, Deutsche Bunsen Gesellschaft, American Chemical Society, American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers, former Vice-President of the Institute and Chairman of the Iron and Steel Committee since 1914 ; member of the Iron and Steel Institute, the American Iron and Steel Institute, Societe de Chimie (France), American Institute of Chemical Engineers ; and honorary member of the American Electroplaters' Association. He was a member of the Board of the Engineering Foundation and a member of the National Research Council, and was the representative of the American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers on the joint conference committee of the federated engineering societies. Dr. Richards was a member of the Chemists' Club (New York), the Engineers' Club (Philadelphia), and the Niagara Club (Niagara Falls).

He was the author of a treatise on "Aluminium " in 1887, of "Metallurgical Calculations," Part I., "General Metallurgy " in 1906 ; Part II., "Iron and Steel," 1907 ; and Part III., "Non-Ferrous Metals," 1908 ; also of articles on metallurgy in Chandler's Encyclopaedia and of many contributions to scientific journals. He was the translator of books from German and Italian entitled "Electrolysis of Water," "Electrometallurgy of Chromium," "Arrangement of Electrolytic Laboratories," "Electrolytic Production of Metallic Objects," and "Cementation of Iron and Steel."

As Secretary of the American Electrochemical Society, Dr. Richards served most conscientiously and untiringly, and by his death that Society has undoubtedly incurred an irreparable loss. Dr. Richards was elected a member of the Institute of Metals on December 30, 1919.


1921 Obituary [3]



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