Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

Registered UK Charity (No. 115342)

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 149,723 pages of information and 235,473 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Kirk Brothers and Co

From Graces Guide

Henry Kirk and Thomas Kirk of Workington

1863 'NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Partnership heretofore subsisting between us, the undersigned, Henry Kirk, Thomas Kirk, Peter Kirk, and Thomas Dineen, carrying on Business together as Iron Manufacturers, under the Style or Firm of KIRKS and DINEEN, at New Yard, Workington, in the County of Cumberland, was this day DISSOLVED by mutual consent, as far as regards Peter Kirk and Thomas Dineen. All Debts due to and owing by the said Firm have been transferred to the said Henry Kirk and Thomas Kirk, and will be received and paid by them.
Mr. C. W. DIXON, of Wakefield, takes the place of the retiring Partners. He has acquired some Practical Knowledge as Assistant Engineer in one of tbe most extensive Iron and Coal concerns in the West Riding of Yorkshire. The Firm will in future be known as KIRKS & DIXON.
Our Best Scrap Iron being extensively used by the Cumberland, Scotch, and Irish Shipbuilders, and having given general satisfaction, have repeatedly been requested by them to supply Rivets as well.
Mr. Dineen is now retiring from our Firm for the purpose of commencing the Rivet Making Business, and as the Rivets will be made from our Best Scrap Iron, we have no doubt their giving general satisfaction to consumers, having been passed both by Lloyd’s and Underwriters’ Inspectors. Nothing shall be wanting on the part of the new Firm to keep up the Quality of the Iron, and they trust by this meoans to ensure increased demand.'[1]

1908 'WORKINGTON IRON FIRM WOUND UP.
At a fully attended meeting of the shareholders in Messrs. Kirk Brothers, iron manufacturers, Workington, yesterday, it was unanimously resolved that the company should be voluntarily wound up, and Mr. W. B. Peat, of London, was appointed liquidator. The firm was established 49 years ago, and it is estimated that the loss in wages to the district, directly and indirectly, caused by the stoppage of the firm's ironworks at New Yard and Marsh Side, will be nothing short of £100,000 per annum.'[2]

See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. Cumberland Pacquet, and Ware's Whitehaven Advertiser - Tuesday 10 November 1863
  2. Sheffield Daily Telegraph, 8 January 1908