Grace's Guide

British Industrial History

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 134,030 pages of information and 213,093 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Salmons and Sons

From Graces Guide

Jump to: navigation, search
November 1909.
1914.
King automiobile March 1916.
1917
January 1920.
January 1920.
January 1920.
August 1923
August 1926. Cleveland Light Six.
1927.
October 1931.
October 1936.

of Newport Pagnell, Bucks

of London (showroom)

1830 Company established as a small coachbuilder and traded as Joseph Salmons

1869 Announcement 'Joseph Salmons, Coach Builder, etc. Newport Pagnell, most gratefully thanks the nobility, clergy, gentry, and public generally, for the kind patronage bestowed on him for a period of nearly 40 years, and now takes this opportunity of informing them that he has this day taken his sons Thomas and Joseph Salmons into Partnership, and that for the future the Business will be carried them under the name of Salmons and Sons,'[1]

c1898 With the advent of the internal combustion engine, the company progressed into developing coachbuilt cars.

1899 Advertising that they specialise in vehicles seating ten or twelve persons.[2]

Importer of King early automobile from America.

1914 Carriage and expert motor car body builders. Employees 300. [3]

1923 Salmons Light Car Co built 11.9hp and 13.9hp cars

1925 Announced the Tickford All Weather saloon, which was actually a convertible with the hood mechanism operated by inserting and turning a handle in the rear quarter-panel.

By the late 1930s, 450 people were employed producing 30 car bodies a week.

1942 the company ceased family ownership and became Tickford Motor Bodies, simply known by the name of Tickford.

See Also

Loading...

Sources of Information

  1. Croydon's Weekly Standard - Saturday 09 January 1869
  2. The Autocar 1899/03/18
  3. 1914 Whitakers Red Book