Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

Registered UK Charity (No. 115342)

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Samuel Faulkner and Co

From Graces Guide

A firm of cotton and silk spinners

John Owens entered into partnership with George and his cousin Samuel Faulkner as Samuel Faulkner and Co., fine spinners. Samuel was responsible for the management of the mill.

The mill was destroyed by fire, John Owens leaving the partnership shortly thereafter.

1836 DESTRUCTION OF MESSRS. FAULKNER AND CO.'S COTTON MILL BY FIRE.
Early on Saturday morning last one of the most destructive fires which has lately occurred in this neighbourhood broke out in the new millof Messrs. Samuel Faulkner and Co., Jersey-street, Ancoats, by the side of the Rochdale Canal. The new mill (which was only finished about eighteen months since) was a building having eight floors and a cock-loft and was 70 feet long, by 55 feet in width, separated from an older and much larger mill by a wall of thirteen inches in thickness only. The older mill had only seven floors in height, and a cock-loft, and its by gable adjoined the side of the new mill. The fire was first discovered about twenty minutes before seven o'clock, in the fourth story of the building, and appeared to have only recently broken out; but the flames spread to the window-frames and flooring above with such rapidity, that the hands employed in the room, after attempting to arrest its progress by playing upon the flames with the force-pumps connected with the steam engines, were soon compelled to abandon it and retire to the lower part of the mill. In the mean time notice of the fire had been despatched to the police yard, which is more than a mile distant, and, about a quarter past seven, Mr. Rose, the superintendant, and a complement of firemen, with three engines, arrived. By this time, however, the five upper floors of the buiiding had been completely destroyed, and part of the next one soon to afterwards fell in with a tremendous crash, folldwed by the outer walls of the building down to the third story. It was at once obvious to Mr. Rose that any efforts to save the remainder of the building must prove fruitless, and he therefore very judiciously turned his attention to the old mill, with a view of preventing the fire from communicating to it. .....' Continues at length. [1]

See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. Manchester Times - Saturday 17 December 1836