Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

Registered UK Charity (No. 115342)

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Samuel Hewlett

From Graces Guide

S Hewlett of Soudley, Glos

Born c.1768

1823 Established a foundry at Camp Mill, Soudley on the same site as the present Dean Heritage Centre building. This apparently operated until 1876[1]

The following historical information is taken from 'The Industrial History of Dean' by Cyril Hart [2]:

  • 1809 Samuel Hewett was a subscriber to the Lydney and Lydbrook Railway Co
  • By 1820 he was using Bradley Forge as an ironfoundry
  • Probably by 1823 he had established a new foundry 1/4 mile upstream of Camp Hill, although the location was sometimes referred to as Ayleford. The two foundries probably ran concurrently.
  • 1829 Partnership dissolved between S. Hewlett and J. Hale, Soudley iron foundry.[3]
  • 1841 Camp Hill foundry recorded as occupied by Thomas Hewlett.
  • 1850 Samuel Hewlett recorded as having, at Camp Hill, a saw pit, timber yard, warehouse with cottages above, turning mill, foundry blacksmith's shop. He demised to his sons George and William most of his stock in trade
  • 1855 Samuel's executors assigned to his son George Hewlett, 'ironfounder of Ayleaford', the lease of the Camp Hill premises.
  • 1861 Henry Crawshay sold the Soudley Iron Foundry and five cottages, with the sawpit, toolhouse, millhouse, workshops, etc, "late in the occupation of Samuel Hewlett and William Hewlett, and now of George Hewlett", to George Hewlett of Bradley House.
  • 1862 George Hewlett sold the property to Peter Constance, wood turner, and it was mortgaged back to Hewlett two days later.
  • Camp Hill premises subsequently used as a flour mill, leatherboard mill, sawmill, car scrapyard.
  • Samuel Hewlett had a third foundry at Upper Bilson in Lower Cinderford, established some time after 1838 but before 1852. Cyril Hart believed the location to have been on what was then (1971) derelict land behind 'Yorke's Fish Restaurant' on the west of Cinderford High Street.

The Camp Hill site is now home to the Dean Heritage Centre

1851 Census return gives Samuel Hewlett's occupation as an ironfounder employing 14 men. Age 83.

Cyril Hart identified three foundries occupied by Hewlett. However, a cast iron railway wagon wheel seen at Dean Heritage Centre is marked 'Hewlett' and 'Nofold'. There was a place near Cinderford called Nofold Green, probably a colliery, and references have been found to a colliery called Nofold Engine. Did Hewlett have another foundry at one of these collieries, or did he cast wheels bearing the owner's name?


See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. [1] 'The History of the Dean Heritage Centre's site at Camp Mill'
  2. 'The Industrial History of Dean' by Cyril Hart, David & Charles, 1971
  3. London Evening Standard, 9 December 1829