Grace's Guide

British Industrial History

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 139,081 pages of information and 225,328 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Thomas Brown Mackenzie

From Graces Guide

Jump to: navigation, search

Thomas Brown Mackenzie (1857-1935) of David Colville and Sons


1935 Obituary [1]

ENGINEERS in the iron and steel industry have lost a leading member of their profession by the recent death of Mr. Thomas Brown Mackenzie, who, in 1923, retired from the post of chief engineer to David Colville and Sons, Ltd, after a period of service of over twenty-eight years.

He was a native of Renfrew and received his education in Glasgow, where he served his apprenticeship with John Norman and Co., of Port Dundas. Later ho obtained further experionee at the Hyde Park Locomotive Works, Springburn. and returned to his former firm to take charge of the drawing-office after the business had been taken over by J. Copeland and Co.

While engaged in the execution of a contract for his firm at Colville's Dalzell Works, the late Mr. David Colville invited him to take charge of the Dalzell drawing-office. He took up this position in 1895.

In 1900 Mr. Mackenzie was appointed chief engineer for all new construction, and from that time onward he was largely responsible for the design and remodelling of plant at the various works of the company. The striking increases in capacity and output of the firm's works were largely duo to schemes initiated by Mr. Mackenzie. We may particularly mention in this connection the extensions at the Glengarnock and Clydebridge Steel Works, and other improvements.

He travelled widely in America and on the Continent in his study of steelworks practice, and had a thorough grasp of the chemical and metallurgical sides of the industry. He became to be looked upon as one of our ablest steelworks engineers.

He was a life member of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, a member of the Iron and Steel Institute, the Institution of Engineers and Shipbuilders in Scotland, and of the West of Scotland Iron and Steel Institute, and an associate of the Institution of Electrical Engineers.

He look a deep interest in the historical side of engineering, and frequently wrote for Colville's Magazine on such subjects as "The Evolution of the Steam Engine" and "Tools of Our Trade." He was deeply concerned with the welfare and education of young engineers; and founded a Mackenzie Trust Fund for providing awards to those who distinguished themselves at evening classes.


1935 Obituary [2]

THOMAS BROWN MACKENZIE was for many years chief engineer to Messrs. David Colville and Sons, Ltd., of Motherwell.

He was born in Renfrew in 1857 and was apprenticed to Messrs. J. Norman and Company, of Port Dundas. He remained with the firm as a draughtsman and then joined Messrs. Nielson's Hyde Park locomotive works, Glasgow, in a similar capacity. Subsequently the former firm was merged with Messrs. J. Copeland and Company and Mr. Mackenzie returned to take charge of the drawing office.

In 1896 he commenced his association with Messrs. Colville, when he took charge of the firm's drawing office at Dalzell. He was promoted to be chief engineer in charge of new construction in 1900, holding this position until his retirement in 1923. He was largely responsible for the erection of new plant at the firm's various works and for the design and layout of new workshops, notably the Glengarnock and Clydebridge Steel Works. In addition he travelled widely on the Continent and in America in order to study steelworks practice.

He contributed several articles to the technical press, and took a keen interest in engineering education, founding the Mackenzie Trust Fund to provide prizes for students at evening classes. He was one of the Institution's oldest Members, having been elected a Graduate in 1883 and transferred to Membership in 1902. For ten years he served on the Committee of the Scottish Branch. In addition he was an Associate of the Institution of Electrical Engineers.

He died on 5th August 1935, and by his trust settlement he bequeathed a sum of £15,000 for the foundation and endowment of scholarships in mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, and metallurgy, at the Royal Technical College, Glasgow.


1935 Obituary [3]

THOMAS BROWN MACKENZIE, who died on August 5, 1935, was one of the leading engineers in the iron and steel industry.

A native of Renfrew, he received his education in Glasgow and served an apprenticeship with Messrs. John Norman and Co., of Port Dundas. He obtained further experience at the Hyde Park Locomotive Works, Springburn, and returned to his former firm to take charge of the drawing office after the business had been taken over by Messrs. J. Copeland and Co.

In 1895 he was invited to take charge of the Dalzell Works drawing office of Messrs. David Colville and Sons, Ltd., and five years later he became chief engineer for all new construction. In this capacity he was responsible for the design and remodelling of plant at the various works of the company - such as the extensions at the Glengarnock and Clydebridge Steel Works, for instance.

He travelled widely in America and on the Continent in his study of steelworks practice, and was regarded as one of our ablest steelworks engineers. He was very much interested in the historical aspect of engineering, and was also deeply concerned with the welfare and education of young engineers; in furtherance of this object he founded a Mackenzie Trust Fund for the provision of awards to those who distinguished themselves at evening classes.

A life member of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, a member of the Institution of Engineers and Shipbuilders in Scotland, and of the West of Scotland Iron and Steel Institute, he was also a life member of the Iron and Steel Institute, which he joined in 1901. Of his published papers one, on "Utilisation of waste heat from open-hearth furnaces for the generation of steam," was read before the Institute in 1918.


See Also

Loading...

Sources of Information