Grace's Guide

British Industrial History

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 133,755 pages of information and 211,898 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Victoria Motor and Cycle Co

From Graces Guide

Jump to: navigation, search
July 1907.

of 163 West George Street, Glasgow

1899 The company was registered on 26 April, as the Victoria Cycle Co, in reconstruction of the New Victoria Cycle Manufacturing Co of Scotland. [1]

1906 The name was changed as above.

1910/11 Listed as: 1910/11: Victoria Motor and Cycle Company Ltd, manufacturers of Victoria motors, Victoria, Windsor & Osborne cycles, component parts, and factors of all kinds of motor & cycle accessories, Victoria Works, Dennistoun. Telegraph address "Bicycle". Secy.'s & regd. office, 163 West George St; Matt Mitchell, C.A., secy.[2]

1913-16 Annual reports[3]

1918/19 Listed as: Victoria Motor and Cycle Company Ltd, manufacturers of Victoria motors, Victoria, Windsor & Osborne cycles, component parts, and factors of all kinds of motor & cycle accessories, Victoria Works, Dennistoun. Telegraph address "Bicycle". Secy.'s & regd. office, 163 West George St; Matt Mitchell, C.A., secy.


Victoria of Dennistoun, Glasgow, produced motorcycles from 1902 to 1928.

1902 The company made their own frames to carry bought-in engines and other components. The machines were typical of the era, but of excellent quality. Gradually, over the years, they improved technically.

1908 At the late-Stanley show they exhibited a lightweight, two-stroke model. It had a 143cc engine, Ruthardt magneto and the option of a drop frame to provide a ladies' model. They were still very conventional in style.

1912 Precision engines were now being used, along with an Armstrong three-speed rear hub.

1914 A Precision V-twin, Villiers two-stroke and a 2hp lightweight were added.

1915 The same range continued into that year, but wartime brought a halt to production.

Post-war. They offered a small range using 147cc and 247cc Villiers engines, plus a choice of transmission.

1924 The range was augmented with the addition of four-stroke models using JAP engines.

1925 Engines used were Villiers 147cc, 247cc and 343cc, plus 293cc, 596cc JAP. All had three speeds, but only three had all-chain drive.

1928 The line ran on, little altered, until this year.


See Also

Loading...

Sources of Information

  1. The Stock Exchange Year Book 1908
  2. 1910/11 GPO Directory
  3. Coventry Archives
  • The British Motorcycle Directory - Over 1,100 Marques from 1888 - by Roy Bacon and Ken Hallworth. Pub: The Crowood Press 2004 ISBN 1 86126 674 X
  • The Encyclopedia of the Motorcycle by Peter Henshaw. Published 2007. ISBN 978 1 8401 3967 9