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William George Kirkaldy

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William George Kirkaldy (1862-1914) of David Kirkaldy and Son

son of David Kirkaldy (1820-1897)

1897 Took over the testing works after the death of his father

1897 Designed a Revolving Door for Water Bulk-Heads.

1898 Showed a large number of test specimens of worn steel rails to the Institution of Civil Engineers. [1]

William developed a tensile impact machine and published his results in 1910. William George was also closely involved with establishing the National Physical Laboratory.


1914 Obituary [2]

WILLIAM GEORGE KIRKALDY was born in Glasgow on 6th July 1862.

At first he was educated at private schools, and afterwards at University College School, London, which he left in 1880.

He then went into the workshops of his father, the late Mr. David Kirkaldy, Southwark Street, London, and gradually took up the duties of testing engineer.

In 1884 he entered into partnership with his father, the firm being known as David Kirkaldy and Son, and since then he had practised as a public testing engineer.

In 1910 he contributed a Paper to this Institution, in collaboration with Captain H. Riall Sankey and Mr. Bertram Blount, on "Comparison of the Tensile, Impact-Tensile, and Repeated- Bending Methods of Testing Steel." He was awarded a Telford Premium by the Institution of Civil Engineers, of which he was an Associate Member, for a Paper on "Steel Rails" which was read before that Institution in conjunction with the late Sir W. Roberts-Austen, K.C.B.

His death took place in London on 10th April 1914, in his fifty-second year.

He was elected a Member of this Institution in 1899; he was also a Member of the Iron and Steel Institute, and other Societies.


1914 Obituary [3]

WILLIAM GEORGE KIRKALDY died on April 10, 1914. He was the son of the late Mr David Kirkaldy, and was born on July 6, 1862.

He was educated at University School, and on coming of age was taken into partnership with his father, the well-known' testing engineer, and the firm of David Kirkaldy & Son established.

The firm soon gained a high reputation for trustworthiness in methods of testing, and William Kirkaldy carried on the traditions of his father, and did much to sustain the high standard according to which public tests should be conducted, winning for himself universal respect. He was an associate member of the Institution of Civil Engineers, and was awarded a Telford premium for a paper on "Steel Rails" read before that Institution in conjunction with the late Sir William Roberts-Austen.. He was also a member of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, and the International Testing Association.

He was elected a member of the Iron and Steel Institute in 1903, and was one of the most constant in attendance at its meetings both at home and abroad.


1914 Obituary [4]

WILLIAM GEORGE KIRKALDY died April 10, 1914.

Mr. Kirkaldy was born in Glasgow on July 6, 1862, being the son of the late David Kirkaldy. He was educated at University College School, and entered into partnership with his father on coming of age, forming the firm, David Kirkaldy & Son.

In addition to his membership of the Institute of Metals, to which he was elected in 1913, Mr. Kirkaldy was an Associate Member of the Institution of Civil Engineers, a Member of the Iron and Steel Institute, the Royal Institution, the International Association for the Testing of Materials, the Royal Society of Arts, the Concrete Institute, and the Court of the Worshipful Company of Turners. He was awarded the Telford Premium by the Institution of Civil Engineers for his paper on "Steel Rails," read before the Institution in conjunction with the late Sir William Roberts-Austen.


1914 Obituary [5]



1914 Obituary.[6]



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