Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

Registered UK Charity (No. 115342)

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

William Henry Porter

From Graces Guide

1838 Working for James Honiball at his warehouse in Cheapside, Porter and a fellow employee, developed an improved design of anchor which Honiball generously patented in Porter's name.

1854 "In the Matter of Letters Patent granted to William Henry Porter, of Russia-row, Milk-street, Cheapside, in the city of London, Ware- houseman, for "improvements in anchors," bearing date and sealed at Westminster, the 15th day of August, 1838 ; and also of certain Letters Patent granted to Mary Honiball, of Saint John's Wood, Widow, for the said invention of improvements in anchors, bearing date and sealed at Westminster, the 9th day of February, 1853.

"NOTICE is hereby given, that under and in pursuance of the second section of an Act made and passed in the fifth and sixth years of the reign of His late Majesty King William the Fourth, chapter 83, intituled "An Act to amend the law touching Letters Patent for Inventions," the said Mary Honiball intends to petition Her Majesty in Council praying Her Majesty to confirm the said letters patent, or to grant new letters patent for the invention for which the same were granted, notwithstanding the said William Henry Porter was not the first inventor thereof; and notice is hereby further given, that an application will be made on the 29th day of August, 1854, to the Right Honourable the Lords of the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council, or so soon after as their lordships shall be sitting and counsel can be heard, to fix a day for the hearing of the matters contained in the said petition ; and all persons desirous of being heard in opposition to the prayer of such petition, are, on or before the said 29th day of August, 1854, to enter a caveat at the Privy Council Office.[1]

See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. London gazette 21 July 1854