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William Lawrence Williams

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William Lawrence Williams (1848-1898)


1898 Obituary [1]

WILLIAM LAWRENCE WILLIAMS was born in Wales on 28th August 1848, being the son of Mr. J. T. Williams of Rhydycilgwynissa, Ruthin.

After serving a five years' apprenticeship 1863-8 to Messrs. Peto, Brassey, and Betts, Canada Works, Birkenhead, he was employed for three years longer in the same works, which at that time were engaged in the construction of bridge-work, locomotives, and large machinery, for the Grand Trunk Railway and other lines in America.

In 1871 he became chief assistant and subsequently works manager to Messrs. Brown Brothers, hydraulic engineers, Rosebank Iron Works, Edinburgh.

Leaving there in 1880 he started practice in Westminster as a consulting engineer, designing hydraulic and steam machinery, steam tugs, barges, and a steam reversing engine which was largely used; and lie fitted extensive refrigerating apparatus into barges on the Thames.

As consulting engineer to the London and Tilbury and other lighterage companies, and to Messrs. William Cory and Sons, he designed for the last a new pattern of crane, which was erected on their derricks for loading barges on the outside of the discharging ship.

His death took place in Edinburgh on 28th August 1898 at the age of fifty.

He became a Member of this Institution in 1873, and was also a Member of the Institution of Civil Engineers.


1899 Obituary [2]

WILLIAM LAWRENCE WILLIAMS served an apprenticeship to Thomas Brassey and Co, at the Canada Works, Birkenhead, from 1863 to 1868, and for three years afterwards was employed in those works. He there acquired a thorough practical training as an engineer, being engaged on the construction of bridge work, locomotives and large plant for the Grand Trunk and other lines in America.

He left the Canada works in 1871, to become chief assistant and subsequently works manager to Brown Brothers, hydraulic engineers, of the Rosebank Ironworks, Edinburgh, where for ten years he was responsible for many important contracts, including hydraulic machinery, at the Hamburg, Ayr, Bo’ness, and Cardiff Docks, and for the North British Railway Company.

Leaving Edinburgh, in 1880, Mr. Williams started practice in Westminster as a consulting engineer, and soon succeeded in securing an extensive connection. His work consisted mainly in designing hydraulic and steam machinery, steam-tugs, barges, &c. He invented an hydraulic capstan and a steam reversing engine which were considerably used, and he fitted refrigerating plant into barges on the river.

He was consulting engineer to the London and Tilbury Lighterage Company, Messrs. Wm. Cory & Son, and other important companies.

For Messrs. Cory & Son he designed, in conjunction with Mr. Henry Adams, a crane of an entirely new pattern, which was erected on their derricks for loading barges on the outside of the vessel being discharged.

He assisted Messrs. Hunter and English in the design of hydraulic machinery, and designed auxiliary engines for the steamers of the Pacific Steam Navigation Company, the London and North Western Railway Company, the City of Dublin Steam-Packet Company, and the East and West India Docks Company.

Mr. Williams died in Edinburgh on the 28th August, 1898, at the age of 50.

He was elected an Associate Member on the 19th May, 1885, and was transferred to the class of Members on the 8th March, 1887. He was also a Member of the [Institution of Mechanical Engineers.



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