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British Industrial History

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Difference between revisions of "British Shipbuilders"

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(Assets subsumed by British Shipbuilders)
 
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* [[Harland and Wolff]]
 
* [[Harland and Wolff]]
 
* [[R. and W. Hawthorn, Leslie and Co|Hawthorn, Leslie and Co]]
 
* [[R. and W. Hawthorn, Leslie and Co|Hawthorn, Leslie and Co]]
* [[Northwestern Ship Repairers and Shipbuilding]]
 
 
* [[John Readhead and Sons]]
 
* [[John Readhead and Sons]]
 
* [[Scotts Shipbuilding and Engineering Co]]
 
* [[Scotts Shipbuilding and Engineering Co]]
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* [[Wallsend Slipway and Engineering Co|Wallsend Slipway Co]]
 
* [[Wallsend Slipway and Engineering Co|Wallsend Slipway Co]]
 
* [[Yarrow and Co|Yarrow Shipbuilders]]
 
* [[Yarrow and Co|Yarrow Shipbuilders]]
 
 
  
 
== See Also ==
 
== See Also ==

Latest revision as of 09:48, 21 February 2020

British Shipbuilders Corporation was a public corporation that owned and managed the UK shipbuilding industry from 1977 and through the 1980s.

1977 The corporation was founded as a result of the Aircraft and Shipbuilding Industries Act 1977 which nationalised all major British shipbuilding companies. The same act nationalised the three large British aviation companies and grouped them in an analogous corporation, British Aerospace.

1977 Acquired John G. Kincaid and Co under the Aircraft and Shipbuilding Industries Act 1977.[1]

Harland and Wolff, the only shipbuilder based in Northern Ireland was a special political case and remained outside the control of the British Shipbuilders management, despite being in its ownership.

1981 Set up a subsidiary company British Shipbuilders Engineering Technical Services to spearhead marketing, sales, design and management of technical projects for customers in power generation, offshore ship-owning and ship-repairing.[2]

1981 Closed the Robb Caledon shipyard in Dundee in an attempt to save money.[3]

1982 "Although running at a significant profit, Falmouth had to undergo drastic surgery to reach viability. It employed 1,400 in 1979 but just have 375 now." Since 1977 the overall BS shiprepair workforce has been cut from 9,000 to 4,136.[4]

1983 British Shipbuilders was privatised in 1983 under the terms of the British Shipbuilders Act 1983. The various divisions that had survived under nationalised ownership were divested throughout the 1980s as the company wound up operations.

Assets subsumed by British Shipbuilders

See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. Wikipedia
  2. The Engineer 1981/04/02
  3. The Engineer 1981/06/18
  4. The Engineer 1982/03/11

[1] Wikipedia