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Charles Lysaght Bruce Hewson

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Charles Lysaght Bruce Hewson (1881-1917)


1918 Obituary [1]

Lieutenant CHARLES LYSAGHT BRUCE HEWSON, R.E., second son of the late George Hewson, D.L., of Ennismore, Co. Kerry, was born on 1st September 1881.

He was educated at schools at Clifton and Tipperary, and in July 1899 he began an apprenticeship at the locomotive shops of the London and North Western Railway, Crewe. During that period he also studied at the Crewe Mechanics' Institute.

On leaving in 1903 he went as assistant in the Running Superintendent's Office of the Great Southern and Western Railway, Ireland, but had to leave a few months later owing to serious illness.

In May 1905 he went to Egypt, being appointed assistant and district locomotive superintendent on the Sudan Railways during the construction of the Nile to Red Sea Railway. On the completion of this railway in September 1907 he was appointed junior assistant locomotive superintendent to the Government Railways of Southern Nigeria, and in July 1910 he took charge of the locomotive, carriage and wagon shops at Lagos during the absence of the works manager. Subsequently he became District Locomotive Superintendent of the Olokemeji-Jebba Division.

In 1914, shortly after the commencement of the Cameroons Campaign, he was commissioned Lieutenant, and attached to the Royal Engineers, and the railway contingent under his command did excellent work in repairing the railways and locomotives, being mentioned by General Cunliffe in his dispatches.

He was invalided from Nigeria, after two months in hospital, from fever contracted in the German Cameroons, and died on the voyage home on 12th April 1917, in his thirty-sixth year.

He became an Associate Member of this Institution in 1908, and a Member in 1911.


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