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British Industrial History

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Edward Dames Hamill

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Edward Dames Hamill (1816-1892)


1892 Obituary [1]

EDWARD DAMES HANILL, only son of the late Mr. Hugh Hamill, of Hartfield, CO. Dublin, was born in 1816. After being educated at Stoneyhurst, he served a regular pupilage under the late H. H. Price, Civil Engineer.

He was then for three years Assistant Resident Engineer on the construction of the Chippenham district of the Great Western Railway, on the completion of which he entered into partnership with A. B. Frend, as Contractors for public works. That partnership lasted for about twelve years, during which the firm carried out many works of considerable importance, and at that time of more or less novelty. Among these may be mentioned the laying of the earliest underground telegraphs in England, those from London to Dover and London to Liverpool; the drainage, for the first time on the pipe-system, of the towns of Hitchin, Watford, Harrow and Worthing; and the construction of the water-tower at Worthing, and of the Lambeth Waterworks at Thames Ditton.

On the dissolution of the partnership, Mr. Hamill became Engineer to the late W. Edward Price, Contractor, for whom he carried out some extensive works abroad, notably the construction of the Marseilles and Avignon Railway.

He was subsequently Engineer to the late Charles Waring, then Contractor for the construction of the South Eastern Railway of Portugal, upon which work he was engaged between the years 1860 and 1866.

In the latter year Mr. Hamill returned to England; but, although he took offices in Westminster, he may be said to have practically abandoned from that time the pursuit of the profession. . . . [more]



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