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British Industrial History

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Frederick Ljungstrom

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1964.

Frederick Ljungstrom ( -1964)

Brother of Birger Ljungstrom

1920 Fredrik Ljungström imagined how he could improve ventilation without losing heat and conceived the idea of the air preheater.

1922 The first Ljungström air preheater was installed in a chocolate factory.



1964 Obituary [1]

Dr Frederick Ljungstrom (Hon Member), who died on 19th February, was an engineer of international status whose vision and talents enabled him to contribute significantly to the development of mechanical engineering in his lifetime.

Although born and educated in Sweden, he obtained part of his training at Newcastle upon Tyne. This connection with Britain was renewed in the mid-1920's when the Ljungstrom turbine locomotive, built under licence by Beyer Peacock and Co., was tested extensively on the Midland section of the L.M.S. Railway.

Another mechanical innovation bearing his name is an air pre-heater; and he was also responsible for the Stal steam turbine, developed jointly with his brother. From 1890 to 1896 he worked with his brother on the development of the Svea bicycle. Later they both worked for Alfred Nobel.

During the 1939-45 war, Dr Ljungstrom eased his country's fuel problems by inventing a method of extracting oil from shale: later he worked on the stabilization of sailing vessels, using hydrofoils.

Among the many honours conferred on Dr Ljungstrom was this Institution's James Watt International Medal, which he received in 1949. In connection with this award, Dr Ljungstrom delivered a lecture to the Institution dealing with his major inventions. He was made an Honorary Member in 1950, and was also a Member of the Royal Academy of Science, Sweden; this is a rare honour for an engineer.


See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. 1964 Institution of Mechanical Engineers: Obituaries
  • [1] Ljungstrom history