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British Industrial History

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Difference between revisions of "GEC Turbine Generators"

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1969 '''GEC Power Engineering''' was formed which included<ref>The Times, 10 January 1969</ref> [[English Electric-AEI Turbine Generators|English Electric-AEI Turbines]]
 
1969 '''GEC Power Engineering''' was formed which included<ref>The Times, 10 January 1969</ref> [[English Electric-AEI Turbine Generators|English Electric-AEI Turbines]]
  
The main manufacturing centres were at Rugby (HQ), Trafford Park, and Stafford (Generators).
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The main manufacturing centres were at Rugby (HQ and main design centre for steam turbines), Trafford Park (low pressure turbines), and Stafford (Generators).
  
 
1982 '''GEC Turbine Generators''' took a Queen's Award for Export Achievement for its steam turbines and associated generators for fossil-fired and nuclear power stations.<ref>The Engineer 1982/04/22</ref>
 
1982 '''GEC Turbine Generators''' took a Queen's Award for Export Achievement for its steam turbines and associated generators for fossil-fired and nuclear power stations.<ref>The Engineer 1982/04/22</ref>
  
This part of GEC was merged with Alsthom, and operated as GEC-Alsthom until renamed ALSTOM, as control moved to France. This part of ALSTOM is now owned by GE (USA).
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1998 This part of GEC was merged with part of [[CGE]], and operated as [[GEC Alsthom|GEC-Alsthom Turbine Generators]] until renamed [[Alstom|ALSTOM]] in 1998 as control moved to France. This part of ALSTOM is now owned by GE (USA).
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Privatisation, and the 'dash for gas' encouraged by the goverment, resulted in a marked reduction in demand for the UK steam turbine makers. GEC/GEC-Alsthom found a new market in cost-effective 'replanting' of steam turbines to increase output and efficiency. Sophisticated analysis of blading, supported by work at the turbine development labs at Barton Dock Road in Trafford Park, allowed GEC-Alsthom to offer packages involving replacing turbine rotors, along with various options for replacement of fixed blading, up to the provision of complete modules comprising rotors, diaphragms and casings. The firm had considerable success in the UK and USA, replanting turbines of their own and other makers' design.
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==See Also==
 
==See Also==

Latest revision as of 14:22, 25 February 2020

A subsidiary of GEC.

1969 GEC Power Engineering was formed which included[1] English Electric-AEI Turbines

The main manufacturing centres were at Rugby (HQ and main design centre for steam turbines), Trafford Park (low pressure turbines), and Stafford (Generators).

1982 GEC Turbine Generators took a Queen's Award for Export Achievement for its steam turbines and associated generators for fossil-fired and nuclear power stations.[2]

1998 This part of GEC was merged with part of CGE, and operated as GEC-Alsthom Turbine Generators until renamed ALSTOM in 1998 as control moved to France. This part of ALSTOM is now owned by GE (USA).

Privatisation, and the 'dash for gas' encouraged by the goverment, resulted in a marked reduction in demand for the UK steam turbine makers. GEC/GEC-Alsthom found a new market in cost-effective 'replanting' of steam turbines to increase output and efficiency. Sophisticated analysis of blading, supported by work at the turbine development labs at Barton Dock Road in Trafford Park, allowed GEC-Alsthom to offer packages involving replacing turbine rotors, along with various options for replacement of fixed blading, up to the provision of complete modules comprising rotors, diaphragms and casings. The firm had considerable success in the UK and USA, replanting turbines of their own and other makers' design.


See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. The Times, 10 January 1969
  2. The Engineer 1982/04/22