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George Wilson Stevenson

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George Wilson Stevenson (1825-1889)


1890 Obituary [1]

. . . . In 1847, Mr. Stevenson went to the United States, but returned to England within two years. He was soon appointed Surveyor to the Local Board of Loughborough, from which he retired to enter into partnership with William Lee, an Inspector under the Public Health Act. During this partnership he carried out several sewerage and water schemes. In 1856, he received the appointment of Borough Engineer to the Corporation of Halifax. He had almost at once to advise the Corporation in reference to the proposed purchase of the gas undertaking. . . . . [more]


1889 Obituary [2]

GEORGE WILSON STEVENSON was born at Derby on 10th April 1825.

At the age of seventeen he became a pupil of 181r. Hawksley at Nottingham, and remained with him until the expiration of his articles.

In 1847 he went to the United States, but returned to England within two years.

He was soon appointed surveyor to the local board of Loughborough, from which he retired to enter into partnership with Mr. William Lee, an inspector under the Public Health Act. During this partnership he carried out several sewerage and water schemes.

In 1856 he received the appointment of borough engineer to the corporation of Halifax, where he had almost at once to advise in reference to the purchase of the gas undertaking. The parliamentary contest was keen, and under severe cross-examination he at once proved himself an expert witness. The gas works, which were on the side of a steep bill, had to be entirely rebuilt; and great skill was shown in constructing the buildings upon the slope, so that the coal was brought in at the highest point, and the coke taken out at the lowest, with a minimum of handling.

Throughout the ten years of his residence in Halifax he was largely consulted in reference to gas and water undertakings, until he was compelled by increase of business to remove to London in 1866; since which date until within a year of his death he was in constant practice as a consulting engineer for gas, water, and sewerage works.

In 1879 he published a book on "Precedents in Private Bill Legislation affecting Gas and Water Undertakings." He designed new gas works for Westbromwich, Scarborough, Colchester, Peterborough, and several other places; and altogether carried out either in their entirety or partially some sixty works for gas, water, or sewerage.

His death took place on 23rd October 1889 at the age of sixty-four.

He became a Member of this Institution in 1878.


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