Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

Registered UK Charity (No. 115342)

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Difference between revisions of "Golden Lion Bridge (Swindon)"

From Graces Guide
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Photo [https://www.flickr.com/photos/swindonlocal/3693890062 here].
Photo [https://www.flickr.com/photos/swindonlocal/3693890062 here].
1870 'Sir,— After many years of inconvenience arising from that hideous incline and bridge at the Golden Lion Inn, we are, I am glad to hear, shortly to have a new bridge and the level of the roadway reduced. The one to be placed there is what I shall term an Equilibrium Bridge, and it will very much resemble a gasometer. There are to be four cast iron hollow columns standing some eight and a half or more feet above ground, with weights working inside to balance the weight of the bridge. Two of these columns are to be placed on each side of the canal and will serve to guide the bride in its upward and downward movement. This bridge, with its necessary shafts, bevil wheels, chains, &c., &c., will make it a somewhat complicated, expensive, and by no means a handsome one for such a situation. The floor of the bridge will be worked upwards by turning a handle, which will allow boats to pass, the width is to be increased, but the length (or span) is to be unaltered. The estimated cost of the bride is, I believe, £170, £50 being allowed for constructing two dams and for removing the water between them, £30 for reducing the road level, making £250 the total cost of the improvement. Now, sir, I would suggest first that a floating bridge shall he provided, which simply means a wrought iron tank of suitable dimensions with light-looking lattice work sides to prevent persons from falling into the water, constructed to work in and nut of its place with a handle. .... I am, Sir, yours truly, THOS. MIDELTON. 4, Regent Street, New Swindon, Jan. 28, 1870.'<ref>North Wilts Herald - Monday 24 January 1870</ref>





Revision as of 18:03, 29 November 2021

This was a small 'four poster' lifting bridge carrying a roadway (with tramlines added later) over the Wilts and Berks Canal, flanked by two footbridges.

It was demolished in 1918, several years after closure of the canal.

Photo here.

1870 'Sir,— After many years of inconvenience arising from that hideous incline and bridge at the Golden Lion Inn, we are, I am glad to hear, shortly to have a new bridge and the level of the roadway reduced. The one to be placed there is what I shall term an Equilibrium Bridge, and it will very much resemble a gasometer. There are to be four cast iron hollow columns standing some eight and a half or more feet above ground, with weights working inside to balance the weight of the bridge. Two of these columns are to be placed on each side of the canal and will serve to guide the bride in its upward and downward movement. This bridge, with its necessary shafts, bevil wheels, chains, &c., &c., will make it a somewhat complicated, expensive, and by no means a handsome one for such a situation. The floor of the bridge will be worked upwards by turning a handle, which will allow boats to pass, the width is to be increased, but the length (or span) is to be unaltered. The estimated cost of the bride is, I believe, £170, £50 being allowed for constructing two dams and for removing the water between them, £30 for reducing the road level, making £250 the total cost of the improvement. Now, sir, I would suggest first that a floating bridge shall he provided, which simply means a wrought iron tank of suitable dimensions with light-looking lattice work sides to prevent persons from falling into the water, constructed to work in and nut of its place with a handle. .... I am, Sir, yours truly, THOS. MIDELTON. 4, Regent Street, New Swindon, Jan. 28, 1870.'[1]


See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. North Wilts Herald - Monday 24 January 1870