Grace's Guide

British Industrial History

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Difference between revisions of "Inman Line"

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1850 '''Inman Line''' was formed by three partners, [[John Grubb Richardson]], his brothers and [[William Inman]], as the '''Liverpool and Philadelphia SS Co'''
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1850 '''Inman Line''' was formed by [[John Grubb Richardson]], his brothers and [[William Inman]], as the '''Liverpool and Philadelphia Steamship Co'''
  
 
They bought an advanced new ship, the [[SS City of Glasgow]]. She proved profitable because her iron hull required less repair and her screw propulsion system left more room for passengers and freight. The ship's moderate speed also considerably reduced coal consumption.
 
They bought an advanced new ship, the [[SS City of Glasgow]]. She proved profitable because her iron hull required less repair and her screw propulsion system left more room for passengers and freight. The ship's moderate speed also considerably reduced coal consumption.

Revision as of 17:34, 14 February 2020

1850 Inman Line was formed by John Grubb Richardson, his brothers and William Inman, as the Liverpool and Philadelphia Steamship Co

They bought an advanced new ship, the SS City of Glasgow. She proved profitable because her iron hull required less repair and her screw propulsion system left more room for passengers and freight. The ship's moderate speed also considerably reduced coal consumption.

1852 added steerage berths to their ships to cater for the emigrant trade, a new area of business for a steamship company.

Richardson was concerned about the poor conditions experienced by immigrants travelling to America after the famine. From the beginning, he provided better steerage quarters and adopted the recommendations of a Parliamentary Committee to provide cooked meals to immigrants.

Mid 1854 the transatlantic service ceased as all the company ships were employed on Crimean War service

1855 Because of his opposition to war, Richardson sold his interest in the firm to Inman after Inman had chartered ships to the French during the Crimean War.

Two of the partners, who were Quakers, disagreed with the policy of chartering ships for trooping purposes and resigned, leaving William Inman in control. After this the company became unofficially known as Inman Line.

The Inman line emerged after the war as one of the major steamship firms on the Atlantic and ultimately became apart of the American Line.

1856 Resumed transatlantic service.

1857 the official name of the company was changed to Liverpool, New York and Philadelphia SS Co

1867 Inman gained the Queenstown - Halifax contract and started a feeder service between Halifax and St. John, N.B.

1875 The Inman Steamship Co was formed and entered into collaboration with the White Star Line.

By 1886 the company was in serious financial difficulties and could not raise the money to replace the ageing fleet. Voluntary liquidation in October. Assets were purchased by the American-owned International Navigation Co, which already owned the American Line and Red Star Line - presumably giving rise to Inman and International Steamship Co.

1892 The U.S. Mail contract was awarded to the company, providing that the ships were transferred to the U.S. flag.

1893 The last Inman sailing from Liverpool; the service was transferred to Southampton; all ships were U.S. flagged under the ownership of the American Line.


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