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James Miller (1860-1947)

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James Miller (1860-1947)


1947 Obituary [1]

JAMES MILLER, R.S.A., F.R.I.B.A., was born at Auchtergaven in 1860 and died at Stirling on the 28th November, 1947.

He was educated at Perth Academy, and served his architectural apprenticeship in Perth.

In 1888 he was appointed architect to the Caledonian Railway Company, for whom he did important work both before and after starting private practice in 1893.

The acceptance of his designs for the Glasgow International Exhibition of 1301 marked him as an architect of outstanding ability, and these were followed, in 1908, by successful designs for the great museum at Bombay.

Soon afterwards he was the winner in the competition for the new building of The Institution, in Great George Street, and a year later he designed extensive alterations to the building of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers.

Other outstanding designs included his scheme at Bournville, for Messrs. Cadbury, the new Medical School and the new Natural Philosophy buildings for Glasgow University, and his restoration of the ancient Church of the Holy Rude at Stirling. He was a member of the Royal Fine Art Commission of Scotland and was also one of a committee of seven for the Department of Health on matters relating to the housing of the working classes.

Mr. Miller leaves a widow and two daughters, his son, who was also a member of the firm, having died in May 1940.


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