Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

Registered UK Charity (No. 115342)

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Difference between revisions of "Kilton Beck Viaduct"

From Graces Guide
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This was a spectacular curving railway viaduct over Kilton Beck, 678 ft long, with thirteen iron girder spans supported by stone piers, reaching a height of 150 feet.
The viaduct's foundations suffered from mining subsidence, and in 1911 it was decided to bury the viaduct by tipping shale spoil to form an embankment instead. It was necessary to construct a concrete culvert to accommodate the water course.
Photos [https://www.28dayslater.co.uk/threads/kilton-culvert-may-2015.96816/ here] showing the viaduct before and during tipping, and the concrete culvert.
== See Also ==
<what-links-here/>
== Sources of Information ==
<references/>
* [http://www.forgottenrelics.co.uk/bridges/demolished/index.html] Forgotten Relics website - Demolished Viaducts
* 'British Railway Bridges & Viaducts' by Martin Smith, Ian Allan Publishing, 1994
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[[Category: Town - Loftus]]
[[Category: Bridges and Viaducts]]

Latest revision as of 13:23, 25 November 2021

Also known as Kilton Viaduct.

No longer visible!

This was a spectacular curving railway viaduct over Kilton Beck, 678 ft long, with thirteen iron girder spans supported by stone piers, reaching a height of 150 feet.

The viaduct's foundations suffered from mining subsidence, and in 1911 it was decided to bury the viaduct by tipping shale spoil to form an embankment instead. It was necessary to construct a concrete culvert to accommodate the water course.

Photos here showing the viaduct before and during tipping, and the concrete culvert.

See Also

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Sources of Information

  • [1] Forgotten Relics website - Demolished Viaducts
  • 'British Railway Bridges & Viaducts' by Martin Smith, Ian Allan Publishing, 1994