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British Industrial History

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Difference between revisions of "MacAdam, Brothers and Co: Water Turbines"

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(Created page with "''Note: This is a sub-section of MacAdam, Brothers and Co'' MacAdam, Brothers and Co made water turbines of the Fourneyron-type. William Cullen...")
 
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[[image:Im18720607v13-p388ccaAda.jpg|thumb|June 1872. The water turbine.]]
 
''Note: This is a sub-section of [[MacAdam, Brothers and Co]]''
 
''Note: This is a sub-section of [[MacAdam, Brothers and Co]]''
  

Revision as of 16:44, 21 January 2020

June 1872. The water turbine.

Note: This is a sub-section of MacAdam, Brothers and Co

MacAdam, Brothers and Co made water turbines of the Fourneyron-type. William Cullen (of Armagh) had travelled to France to learn more about this type of machine. Benoit Fourneyron was uncooperative, but Cullen was able to glean sufficient information from drawings and site visits to embark on design and testing.[1] Cullen and Robert MacAdam joined forces to produce the machines for sale.

1850 'THE IMPROVED TURBINES OR HORIZONTAL WATER-WHEELS.
THE SUBSCRIBERS ARE PREPARED to undertake the erection of Turbine Water Wheels of the improved construction, and for any height of fall. - Reference can be given to several powerful ones now at work in this neighbourhood, which they have lately erected. M'ADAM, BROTHERS, & Co., Engineers, Soho Foundry. Belfast, November, 1850.'[2]

1869-70 A large Fourneyron-type turbine was supplied to Catteshall Mill on the River Wey at Godalming. It developed approx 50 HP at 25 rpm. It ran until the 1960s, and when the site was redeveloped in 1981 the main components were saved for preservation. They were moved to Ironbridge, where they can be seen in the yard at the Enginuity Museum.


See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. 'Water and Wind Power' by Martin Watts, Shire Publications, 2000
  2. Northern Whig, 12 December 1850