Grace's Guide

British Industrial History

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,972 pages of information and 233,612 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Malcolm Alexander Stewart Riach

From Graces Guide

Revision as of 06:06, 31 May 2020 by Ait (talk | contribs) (Created page with "Malcolm Alexander Stewart Riach (1892- ) 1922 F.R.Ae.S., A.I.N.A., Leading English Authority on the Theory of Airscrews; b. 1892; s. of Col. M. S. Riach, late Cameron Highlan...")
(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Jump to: navigation, search

Malcolm Alexander Stewart Riach (1892- )

1922 F.R.Ae.S., A.I.N.A., Leading English Authority on the Theory of Airscrews; b. 1892; s. of Col. M. S. Riach, late Cameron Highlanders. Ed. Wellington Coll., Berks; Armstrong College, Newcastle-on-Tyne; Imperial College of Science and Technology, S. Kensington. Took up Aviation in 1911 at the London Aerodrome. Career: During the War, Tech. Adviser in Designing and Experimental Depts., 1914-15; Grahame White Aviation Co., Ltd.; 1915-16, William Beardmore and Co., Dalmuir; 1917-18, Boulton and Paul, Norwich; 1918-19, Cons. Engr., Inventions Dept., M. of M., under Admiral Sir R. Bacon; has carried out Private Research Work on Screw Propellers working in air, and the Helicopter Flying Machine; now engaged upon further theoretical Research Work. Publs.: "Airscrews" (Crosby, Lockwood and Son, 1916); "The Screw Propeller in Air" (Proc. Royal Aero. Soc., 1917); "A Complete Theory of the Screw Propeller" (Engineering, Sept.—Dec., 1919); "The Helicopter Flying Machine" (Aircraft Engineering, 1920-21); "Screw Propellers" (Aeronautics, 1920-21); "Steam Cars" (Times Eng. Supplement, Oct., 1920); "A New Theory of the Screw Propeller" (Aeronautics, 1920); "Soaring Flight" (Aeronautics, Feb., 1921), etc. Address: The Grange, Charlcombe, Bath.

See Also

Loading...

Sources of Information