Grace's Guide

British Industrial History

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 148,124 pages of information and 233,665 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Difference between revisions of "Paris and Rouen Railway"

From Graces Guide

Jump to: navigation, search
 
Line 1: Line 1:
 
1840 Line authorised. [[Joseph Locke]] as chief engineer and [[George Neumann]] as his deputy. Also employed as resident engineers [[Samuel Barton Worthington]], [[John Smith (4)|John Smith]] and [[Sturges Meek]].
 
1840 Line authorised. [[Joseph Locke]] as chief engineer and [[George Neumann]] as his deputy. Also employed as resident engineers [[Samuel Barton Worthington]], [[John Smith (4)|John Smith]] and [[Sturges Meek]].
  
Contractors were [[Mackenzie and Brassey]]
+
Contractors were [[Brassey and Mackenzie|Mackenzie and Brassey]]
  
To be 131 km long from Rue Verte Station, Rouen, and run to a junction in the Colombes district of Paris with the [[St. Germain Railway]] and on to a new station being built at Rue St. Lazare.
+
131 km long from Rue Verte Station, Rouen, to a junction in the Colombes district of Paris with the [[St. Germain Railway]] and thence to a new station built at Rue St. Lazare.
  
 
Opened in 1843
 
Opened in 1843

Latest revision as of 16:22, 10 March 2017

1840 Line authorised. Joseph Locke as chief engineer and George Neumann as his deputy. Also employed as resident engineers Samuel Barton Worthington, John Smith and Sturges Meek.

Contractors were Mackenzie and Brassey

131 km long from Rue Verte Station, Rouen, to a junction in the Colombes district of Paris with the St. Germain Railway and thence to a new station built at Rue St. Lazare.

Opened in 1843

See Also

Loading...

Sources of Information

  • William Mackenzie, International Railway Builder. by David Brooke. Published 2004. ISBN 0904685144