Grace's Guide

British Industrial History

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Robert Edward Phillips

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1903.

Robert Edward Phillips (1855-1929)

of Royal Courts Chambers, 70 and 72 Chancery Lane, London, W.C.; and Rochelle, Selhurst Road, South Norwood, London, S.E.

Apprenticed to Davey, Paxman and Co

1881 Civil engineer, boarding in Lambeth[1]

1885 Wrote On the Construction of Modern Cycles

1889 Patent agent.

1895 Associate of Inst Civil Engineers

1901 October. Long letter regarding his dispute with the Dunlop Pneumatic Tyre Co and their unreasonable behaviour.[2]

1904 March. Letter concerning experts; paper on valves and valve mechanisms; and tabulation of dimensions of petrol engines.[3]

1906 of Chancery Lane, London

1911 Robert Edward Phillips 55, engineer, lived in Burnham with Edith Ander Phillips 36, Kathleen Phillips 6, Dorothy Eveline Phillips 3[4]

1926 of Chancery Lane, London[5]

1929 Died in Eton[6]


1903 Bio Note [7]

PHILLIPS, ROBERT E., Assoc. M.I.C.E. and E.E. - Born in Knighton, Radnorshire, July 30th, 1855, and educated at King Edward VI. Grammar School, Ludlow, Mr. Robert E. Phillips was apprenticed Messrs. Davey, Paxman and Co., Engineers, Colchester in 1872; coming to the metropolis to take up a position as one of Sir Frederick Bramwell's assistants in 1880, he subsequently commenced practice as a consulting engineer and patent agent in 1883.

Besides being a member of the Institutions named above, he is a Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Patent Agents, and a member of the Royal Statistical Society. His special study is that of mechanical patents, especially in relation to road vehicles.

Taking up motoring as a pursuit immediately after the passing of the Locomotives on Highways Act of 1896, and commencing at the bottom of the ladder with a motor tricycle, he drove his Petit Duo Mors in the 1000 Miles Trial of the Club as a private owner, and successfully accomplishing the run, obtained the highest award for his car in its class. Mr. Phillips at present drives a Rochet-Schneider car.



See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. 1881 census
  2. The Autocar 1901/10/19
  3. The Autocar 1904/03/12
  4. 1911 census
  5. Civil engineer lists
  6. BMD
  7. 1903/02/26 Automobile Club Journal