Grace's Guide

British Industrial History

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 138,194 pages of information and 223,451 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Difference between revisions of "Silverdale Co"

From Graces Guide

Jump to: navigation, search
 
Line 1: Line 1:
 +
Iron smelting was being carried in two furnaces out at Silverdale in the 1790s, on land leased by a partnership of Thomas Breck, John Breck, William Hyatt, Thomas Pool, and Samuel Hopkins (of Lea Forge, Cheshire). The partnership was formed in April 1792, and George Wood joined in 1794. Walter Sneyd became involved at some point.<ref>'The Economic History of the British Iron & Steel Industry 1784-1879' by Alan Birch, 1967 Frank Cass & Co</ref>
 +
 
1851 Dissolution of the Partnership between [[Ralph Sneyd]], of Keele, in the county of Stafford, Esquire, and [[Francis Stanier]], of Newcastle-under-Lyme, Gentleman, carrying on business at Silverdale, in the said county, as Coal and Iron Masters, under the firm or style of '''The Silverdale Company'''. The business was carried on by Francis Stanier<ref>London Gazette 19 Sept 1851</ref>
 
1851 Dissolution of the Partnership between [[Ralph Sneyd]], of Keele, in the county of Stafford, Esquire, and [[Francis Stanier]], of Newcastle-under-Lyme, Gentleman, carrying on business at Silverdale, in the said county, as Coal and Iron Masters, under the firm or style of '''The Silverdale Company'''. The business was carried on by Francis Stanier<ref>London Gazette 19 Sept 1851</ref>
  

Latest revision as of 16:59, 13 February 2020

Iron smelting was being carried in two furnaces out at Silverdale in the 1790s, on land leased by a partnership of Thomas Breck, John Breck, William Hyatt, Thomas Pool, and Samuel Hopkins (of Lea Forge, Cheshire). The partnership was formed in April 1792, and George Wood joined in 1794. Walter Sneyd became involved at some point.[1]

1851 Dissolution of the Partnership between Ralph Sneyd, of Keele, in the county of Stafford, Esquire, and Francis Stanier, of Newcastle-under-Lyme, Gentleman, carrying on business at Silverdale, in the said county, as Coal and Iron Masters, under the firm or style of The Silverdale Company. The business was carried on by Francis Stanier[2]

The Silverdale Iron Co. had works in Silverdale, Knutton and Chesterton, covering both collieries and blast furnaces; that of the Knutton and Chesterton Works were limited to the manufacture of finished iron. Not long after Thomas Udall joined these concerns in 1866, his firm acquired the collieries and blast furnaces at Apedale, also in North Staffordshire. Later the joint concerns were put together as one undertaking with the name of Stainer and Co.[3]


See Also

Loading...

Sources of Information

  1. 'The Economic History of the British Iron & Steel Industry 1784-1879' by Alan Birch, 1967 Frank Cass & Co
  2. London Gazette 19 Sept 1851
  3. Obituary of Thomas Udall