Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

Registered UK Charity (No. 115342)

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Difference between revisions of "Tees Viaduct"

From Graces Guide
(Created page with "DEMOLISHED in 1971. Located to the west of Barnard Castle Station, it was 244 yards long and 132 feet high. Designed by Thomas Bouch for the South Durham and Lancashire...")
 
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Located to the west of Barnard Castle Station, it was 244 yards long and 132 feet high. Designed by [[Thomas Bouch]] for the [[South Durham and Lancashire Union Railway]] over Stainmore. Opened in 1861. It had lattice girders supported by masonry piers, all of slender proportions. Remained in use until April 1965. Demolition started in 1971, but the stone abutments survive.<ref>[http://www.forgottenrelics.co.uk/bridges/demolished/index.html] Forgotten Relics website - Demolished Viaducts</ref>
Located to the west of Barnard Castle Station, it was 244 yards long and 132 feet high. Designed by [[Thomas Bouch]] for the [[South Durham and Lancashire Union Railway]] over Stainmore. Opened in 1861. It had lattice girders supported by masonry piers, all of slender proportions. Remained in use until April 1965. Demolition started in 1971, but the stone abutments survive.<ref>[http://www.forgottenrelics.co.uk/bridges/demolished/index.html] Forgotten Relics website - Demolished Viaducts</ref>


1914 Contract for reconstruction placed with the Motherwell Bridge Co. There were two  approach spans  of 21ft. long, and five  spans at 110ft.  centres,  each  made  up  of three girders. The  height  of  the  viaduct  from  the  river  was  132ft.  The central girder of each span was strengthened and retained, while the rest of the metal structure was completely renewed. <ref>[https://www.gracesguide.co.uk/Special:MemberUsers?file=b/b4/Er19140327.pdf] The Engineer, 27 March 1914</ref>
1914 Contract for reconstruction placed with the [[Motherwell Bridge and Engineering Co|Motherwell Bridge Co]]. There were two  approach spans  of 21ft. long, and five  spans at 110ft.  centres,  each  made  up  of three girders. The  height  of  the  viaduct  from  the  river  was  132ft.  The central girder of each span was strengthened and retained, while the rest of the metal structure was completely renewed. <ref>[https://www.gracesguide.co.uk/Special:MemberUsers?file=b/b4/Er19140327.pdf] The Engineer, 27 March 1914</ref>





Revision as of 11:16, 25 November 2021

DEMOLISHED in 1971.

Located to the west of Barnard Castle Station, it was 244 yards long and 132 feet high. Designed by Thomas Bouch for the South Durham and Lancashire Union Railway over Stainmore. Opened in 1861. It had lattice girders supported by masonry piers, all of slender proportions. Remained in use until April 1965. Demolition started in 1971, but the stone abutments survive.[1]

1914 Contract for reconstruction placed with the Motherwell Bridge Co. There were two approach spans of 21ft. long, and five spans at 110ft. centres, each made up of three girders. The height of the viaduct from the river was 132ft. The central girder of each span was strengthened and retained, while the rest of the metal structure was completely renewed. [2]


See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. [1] Forgotten Relics website - Demolished Viaducts
  2. [2] The Engineer, 27 March 1914