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British Industrial History

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Thomas Charles Hutchinson

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Thomas Charles Hutchinson (1840-1918), managing director of the Skinningrove Iron Co

son of Thomas Hutchinson, who was connected with the flax industry


1919 Obituary [1]

THOMAS CHARLES HUTCHINSON died on October 17, 1918. He was born at Stockton in 1840, and was educated at the Stockton Grammar School. At the age of fourteen he commenced his business career in the offices of the owners of the Middlesbrough estate. On the development of the iron industry in the Cleveland district, and the erection of new plants, he became connected with Messrs. Fox, Head & Co. at the Newport Rolling-Mills, and superintended the laying out of the iron mills. He continued for about seventeen years as commercial manager and left in 1880 to take up the managing directorship of the Skinningrove Iron Company, the post which he held at the time of his death.

At that time the plant of the Skinningrove Iron Company consisted of two blast-furnaces which were not in operation, and it was not for some time afterwards that they were working. In 1894 the plant was further enlarged and close relationship was established with Messrs. Pease & Partners. Two extra furnaces were built and later a fifth was added. Mines were also started at Boulby to ensure the supply of ore. After visiting several works on the Continent he formulated a scheme for the erection of steelworks and coke-ovens in connection with the existing blast-furnace plant. About eleven years ago he started building operations, and the extensions at the works proceeded continuously up till the time of his death.

He was elected a member of the Iron and Steel Institute in 1882. He was a constant attendant at the meetings and contributed several important papers to its proceedings.


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