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British Industrial History

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William Arthur Ward

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William Arthur Ward (1887-1938)


1938 Obituary [1]

WILLIAM ARTHUR WARD was assistant managing director of Messrs. Thos. W. Ward, Ltd., Albion Works, Sheffield. He was born in Sheffield in 1887 and was educated at the Leys' School, Cambridge, and at the University of Sheffield.

From 1906 to 1909 he received his practical training, first in the Albion Works, and afterwards with Messrs. C. Redman and Sons, machine tool makers, of Halifax, and with the Electric Construction Company, Ltd., of Wolverhampton, motor and generator manufacturers. In 1910 Mr. Ward returned to the Albion Works as assistant works manager, and was concerned with the marketing of new machinery and with the design of new machine tools.

In the early days of the commercial production of oxygen, he supervised the installation of plants for making this gas at the company's various works. He was made local director in 1919 and a director in 1925. He was particularly concerned with the engineering side of the firm's work, and made several visits to the United States and to the Continent in connection with the machinery section, of which he was in charge.

In 1928 Mr. Ward took up his appointment as assistant managing director, which he held until his death on 11th November 1938, Mr. Ward was a keen wireless enthusiast and held a transmitting licence, his interest in the subject extending back to pre-War days.

He was elected a Graduate of the Institution in 1910 and was transferred to Associate Membership in 1913.


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