Grace's Guide

British Industrial History

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 140,195 pages of information and 227,382 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Difference between revisions of "Wren and Hopkinson"

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Wren & Hopkinson: London Road Ironworks, Altrincham Street Manchester. The address also appears as Temple Street, Manchester. The works was evidently at the junction of these two streets, on the west side of Temple Street. The area has now been completely redeveloped.
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'''Wren & Hopkinson''' of London Road Ironworks, Altrincham Street Manchester. The address also appears as Temple Street, Manchester. The works was evidently at the junction of these two streets, on the west side of Temple Street. The area has now been completely redeveloped.
  
 
* Maker of stationary engines. <ref>Stationary Steam Engines of Great Britain by George Watkins. Vol 10</ref>
 
* Maker of stationary engines. <ref>Stationary Steam Engines of Great Britain by George Watkins. Vol 10</ref>

Revision as of 16:19, 5 May 2009

Wren & Hopkinson of London Road Ironworks, Altrincham Street Manchester. The address also appears as Temple Street, Manchester. The works was evidently at the junction of these two streets, on the west side of Temple Street. The area has now been completely redeveloped.

  • Maker of stationary engines. [1]
  • Other products included gears for mills and steamships, waterwheels, hydraulic presses & pumps.
  • John Hopkinson, one of the partners, started as an apprentice with Wren & Bennett, eventually becoming a partner in that company. Two of his sons, John and Edward, became famous in the field of electrical engineering.

Sources of Information

  1. Stationary Steam Engines of Great Britain by George Watkins. Vol 10