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British Industrial History

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Alberto de Arteaga

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Alberto de Arteaga (1854-1937)

1880 care of Juan J. de Arteaga, Rincon 62, Monte Video, Uruguay (or care of Messrs. Hartog Reeves and Co., 13 Cullum Street, London, E.C.)


1937 Obituary [1]

ALBERTO DE ARTEA was connected with various engineering interests in Buenos Aires for practically the whole of his career. He was born in Montevideo, Uruguay, in 1854, but later came to England and graduated at King's College, London, in 1873. He was the Easton Prizeman of his year, and the first foreigner to gain this success, which entitled him to a tree apprenticeship at the Erith works of Messrs. Easton and Anderson.

After completing his practical training he returned in 188O to South America, and was appointed chief engineer of the Artillery College, Buenos Aires. In 1882 he was made director of the marine workshops, at Tigre, of the Argentine Government. After occupying this post for several years he became engineer inspector of the Maritime Prefecture of Buenos Aires. He was also honorary member and secretary of the commission appointed to establish the regulations for mechanics in the Argentine nay. Throughout his career he specialized in technical assessments.

In 1903 he became technical assessor to the Sociedad de Beneticencia of Buenos Aires, an important organization sponsored by the Argentine Government, and in that capacity he was responsible for the machinery and plant installed in the various institutions of the society. Until shortly before his death, which occurred in Buenos Aires on 22nd May 1937, he was consulting engineer to various government institutions.

Mr. de Arteaga was one of the oldest Members of the Institution, his election dating back to 1887.


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