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Charles James Homer

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Charles James Homer (1837-1893)


1893 Obituary [1]

CHARLES JAMES HOMER was born at Hanky on 17th August 1837, and was a pupil under Mr. William Forshaw at Earl Granville's collieries and ironworks from 1852 to 1856, when the development of the collieries and the erection of rolling mills and blast-furnaces was being proceeded with.

Subsequently he entered into general practice as a mining engineer and surveyor; and in 1864 became general manager of the Chatterley ironstone mines at Tunstall.

In 1871 he joined some local gentlemen in the formation of the Chatterley Coal and Iron Co., of which he became the managing director. Blast-furnaces were erected, the mines further developed and additional collieries acquired, including the Whitfield Colliery, for which a private line of railway over two miles long was constructed to connect them with the towns of Tunstall and Burslem; the colliery has since proved one of the most productive and valuable in Staffordshire.

In 1871-2 the Longton, Adderley Green, and Bucknall Railway, about five miles in length, constituting a loop of the North Staffordshire Railway for opening out the collieries in the Adderley Green Valley, was constructed under his direction as engineer; this is now worked by the North Staffordshire Railway, and serves several collieries which were previously land-locked.

In 1873 he became connected with the late Duke of Sutherland, Sir John Ponder, and Mr. Bourne in the development of the Stafford Coal and Iron Works adjoining the Trentham estates. This was virgin ground which had not been proved, and was thought by some to be outside the limits of the North Staffordshire coalfield; but on his advice shafts were put down and the upper measures proved. Permanent shafts were sunk and the most improved mining plant erected and laid out under his superintendence. At these collieries he introduced pit-head frames constructed entirely of iron.

In 1880 he undertook the development of the mines at the Ivy House, Hanley, which are now one of the chief sources of supply to the town of Hanley.

On his advice and with his assistance the Norwich Union Life Insurance Society reopened the collieries at Clough Hall, Kidsgrove, which were subsequently taken over by Mr. Robert Heath. It is estimated that by this operation alone upwards of twenty million tons of fuel were secured from abandonment.

He was also in practice as a consulting engineer; and owing to his extensive knowledge of the geology of the district, he was consulted respecting the development of most of the mines in the neighbourhood, and also of some abroad.

His health had not been good for some time previous to his death, which took place at his residence, the Ivy House, Hanley, on 4th November 1893, at the age of fifty-six.

He became a Member of this Institution in 1867; and was one of the founders of the North Staffordshire Institute of Mining and Mechanical Engineers, of which he was president in 1874 and 1875.


1894 Obituary [2]

CHARLES JAMES HOMER was born at Hanley, North Staffordshire, on the 17th of August, 1837, his family being well known in connection with the mining industry of the neighbourhood.

He was a pupil under the late Mr. William Forshaw at Lord Granville’s collieries and ironworks - now belonging to the Shelton Iron, Steel and Coal Company - from 1852 to 1856, during which time the collieries were developed, and rolling-mills and blast furnaces were erected at those extensive works.

On the expiration of his pupilage Mr. Homer began practice on his own account as a mining engineer and surveyor, and for the next seven years was engaged in designing and constructing ironworks and in opening out extensive collieries.

In 1864 he became general manager of the Chatterley ironstone mines at Tunstall.

Seven years later Mr. Homer joined with some local gentlemen in the formation of the Chatterley Coal and Iron Co, he undertaking the position of managing director....[more]


1894 Obituary [3]

CHARLES JAMES HOMER died on November 4, 1893, at Hanley, at the age of fifty-six. Born at Hanley on August 17, 1837, he was a pupil at Earl Granville's collieries and ironworks from 1852 to 1856.

In 1864 he became general manager of the Chatterley Ironstone Mines at Tunstall, and in 1871 assisted in the formation of the Chatterley Coal and Iron Company, of which he became managing director. He possessed a remarkable knowledge of the geology of the North Staffordshire coalfield, and on his advice, and with his assistance, explorations were made and collieries reopened, by which operations vast quantities of fuel were rendered available. He was one of the founders of the North Staffordshire Institute of Mining and Mechanical Engineers, of which he was president in 1874.

He was elected a member of the Iron and Steel Institute in 1871.


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