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British Industrial History

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Charles Prattman Douglas

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Charles Prattman Douglas (1837-1910) of the Consett Iron Co

1865 Charles Prattman Douglas, Engineer, Consett Iron Works, near Gateshead.[1]

1910 November 5th. Died.[2]


1910 Obituary [3]

CHARLES PRATTMAN DOUGLAS was born at Sunderland on 2nd September 1837, being the youngest son of Mr. Thomas Douglas, shipowner.

He was educated at the Grange School in that town.

He entered the works of Messrs. Robert Stephenson and Co., Newcastle-on-Tyne, as a pupil, and left there in 1861 on his appointment as Engineer of the Blast Furnace and Water Department of the Derwent and Consett Iron Co. He was also connected with the reconstruction of the whole of the works, so that, when they were transferred to the Consett Iron Co. in 1864, he had helped to lay the foundation of the local iron and steel industry.

After thirty-three years' service as Chief Engineer of the Consett Iron Co. he retired in 1894, and took up his residence at Darlington, where he lived until his death, which took place on 5th November 1910, at the age of seventy-three, after an illness of some duration.

He became a Member of this Institution in 1865; he was also a Member of the Iron and Steel Institute and of the Institution of Mining Engineers.


1910 Obituary [4]

CHARLES PRATTMAN DOUGLAS died on November 5, 1910. He was born at Sunderland on September 2, 1837, being the youngest son of Mr. Thomas Douglas, shipowner. He received his early education at the Grange School in that town, and subsequently entered the works of Messrs. Robert Stephenson & Co., Newcastle-on-Tyne, as a pupil.

He left there in 1861 on his appointment as engineer of the blast-furnace and water departments of the Derwent and Consett Iron Company, and he was largely concerned in the reconstruction of the whole of the works. These were transferred in 1864 to the Consett iron Company, Ltd., whose name is now so widely known. After thirty-three years' service as chief engineer of the Consett Iron Company he retired in 1894, and took up his residence at Darlington, where he spent the remainder of his life.

He was a member of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers and of the Institution of Mining Engineers. He was elected a member of the Iron and Steel Institute in 1870.


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