Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

Registered UK Charity (No. 115342)

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Charles Roberson and Co

From Graces Guide

Charles Roberson & Co, of Long Acre, London (1840-1908), artists’ colourmen and picture restorers.

One of the major artists’ suppliers of the 19th and early 20th centuries.

1819 Charles Roberson set up in business as an artists’ colourman at 54 Long Acre.These premises had been used for the sale of brushes and colours since 1803, firstly by John Culbert, then from 1814 by his apprentice, Henry Matley.

1828 Charles Roberson was in partnership with Thomas Miller, trading as Roberson & Miller at 51 Long Acre.

1828-84 The business used a variety of contractors over many years to supply it with certain materials.

1839 the partnership was dissolved. Charles Roberson continued the business at 51 Long Acre, trading as Charles Roberson & Co from 1840.

1853 relocated to 99 Long Acre in 1853; it became one of the major firms of artists’ suppliers.

Roberson was succeeded by his nephew, Charles Park (1820-98)

1889 Roberson’s opened a branch in Piccadilly, close to the Royal Academy

1908 The business became a limited company

1916 One of five firms, including Winsor and Newton, George Rowney and Co, Reeves and Sons and James Newman, acting together as Associated Colour Merchants, which signed an agreement in 1916 with J. Barcham Green and Son to produce a range of papers, watermarked ‘A.C.M.’ and the words ‘Watercolour Paper England’.

1937 relocated to Camden Town.

The business remained in the family until the 1970s

1970s Acquired by a Dutch firm

1987 Went into liquidation. The name was bought by the owner of Cornelissen, who continues to use it for a small range of high-quality materials, trading as Roberson & Co[1]



See Also

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  • [2] National Portrait Gallery

Sources of Information

  1. Website at [1]).