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British Industrial History

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Coventry Mascot

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Coventry Mascot were motorcycles produced from 1922 to 1923 at Stoke, in Coventry.

1922 It was the first Coventry firm to utilize the Barr and Stroud sleeve-valve engine, when, in May of that year, they introduced a 349cc model. To clear the central exhaust stub on the engine, the frame was given a bifurcated front down-tube. It also had Maplestone forks and Webb internal expanding brakes front and rear. A two-speed Burman gearbox with belt final-drive provided the transmission.

1922 Jack Williamson, son of the proprietor of the Guildhall Garage, Salthouse Lane, Hull, raced them competitively.[1] It is probable that the Guildhall Garage were the only agent for Coventry Mascot.

1923 Further options were introduced, in the form of three-speeds; a Bentley and Draper spring frame with shock-absorbers; and a 349cc ohv Bradshaw model with all-chain drive. Following that, they withdrew from the market.

1924 The factory closed

See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. Hull Daily Mail - Wednesday 22 November 1922
  • The British Motorcycle Directory - Over 1,100 Marques from 1888 - by Roy Bacon and Ken Hallworth. Pub: The Crowood Press 2004 ISBN 1 86126 674 X
  • The Encyclopedia of the Motorcycle by Peter Henshaw. Published 2007. ISBN 978 1 8401 3967 9
  • Coventry’s Motorcycle Heritage by Damien Kimberley. Published 2009. ISBN 978 0 7509 5125 9