Grace's Guide

British Industrial History

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Forrestt and Son

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1868. Steam Pinnace.
1886. Lifeboat for Lytham.
January 1888.
December 1889.

Forrestt and Son of the Norway Yard, Limehouse and Britannia Yard, Millwall (1888)

of Wyvenhoe, Essex and the Norway Yard, Limehouse (1889)

1788 Established.

1878 Constructed steam launches for the Royal Navy at Limehouse using the Willans engine[1].

1882 Partnership dissolved. '...the Partnership heretofore subsisting between us the undersigned, Rebecca Bond, Henry Bond, John James Bond, and Arthur Harper Bond, carrying on business at Norway Yard, Limehouse, and at Britannia Yard, Napier's Yard, Millwall, Poplar, both in the county of Middlesex, as Boat Builders, under the style or firm of Forrestt and Son, has been dissolved by mutual consent, as and from the 31st day of January, 1882. All debts due to or owing by the said firm will be received and paid by the said Arthur Harper Bond, who will in future carry on the business...'[2]

1883 "Formerly builders of lifeboats for the Royal National Lifeboat Institution"[3]

1883 Partnership dissolved. '...the Partnership heretofore subsisting between us the undersigned, Arthur Harper Bond and William Marsland Francis Schneider, carrying on business as Ship and Boat Builders and Engineers, at Britannia Yard, Millwall, and Norway Yard, Limehouse, under the style or firm of Forrestt and Son, was, on the 9th day of July instant, dissolved, by mutual consent, the said Arthur Harper Bond having retired on that day from the partnership. All debts due to and owing by the late firm will be received and paid by the said William Marsland Francis Schneider, who will continue to carry on the business under the above style on his separate account...'[4]

1902 Petition for company to be wound-up.[5]

With the decline of shipbuilding on the River Thames, John Assheton Rennie moved to Wivenhoe, in Essex, where he took over the old Forrest Shipbuilding Yard and renamed it the Rennie-Forrest yard, continuing to build river vessels and coasters for the Crown Agents for the Colonies and others. He sold the business after the 1914-1918 war.


See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. The Times, May 06, 1878
  2. The London Gazette Publication date:25 April 1882 Issue:25099 Page:1869
  3. The Engineer 1883
  4. [The London Gazette Publication date:17 July 1883 Issue:25251 Page:3604]
  5. The London Gazette Publication date:9 September 1902 Issue:27472 Page:5834