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British Industrial History

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George Taylor (1820-1875)

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1864. Fernie and Taylor's Machines for Trimming Plates.

George Taylor (1820-1875) of Taylor Brothers and Co

1859 George Taylor, Junior, Clarence Iron Works, Leeds.[1] - Taylor Brothers and Co

1861 George Taylor, Clarence Iron Works, Leeds.[2] - presumably Taylor Brothers and Co

1875 Was Senior partner of Clarence House Ironworks, Leeds.[3]

1875 June 19th. Died age 55[4]


1876 Obituary [5]

GEORGE TAYLOR was born at Low Moor, near Bradford, on 8th August 1820, and in early years served at the Low Moor Iron Works as a hammerman; he afterwards entered the works of Messrs. Cooper Field and Hood, Leeds, where he remained until 1857.

In conjunction with his brothers, James and Samuel Taylor, he then established the Clarence Iron Works, Leeds, for the manufacture of best Yorkshire iron, adding afterwards the manufacture of crucible cast steel.

He distinguished himself particularly in the manufacture of large forgings, such as locomotive crank-axles, for which his firm enjoyed a high reputation, he himself having been one of the earliest workmen who forged a locomotive double crank-axle from one solid piece of iron; and he was well known for his skill in that description of work.

After his brothers' death he continued to carry on the business until the time of his death, which occurred on 19th June 1875, in the 55th year of his age, from the bursting of a blood vessel.

He became a Member of the Institution in 1861.


1875 Obituary [6]

MR. GEORGE TAYLOR was born at Lowmoor, Yorkshire, on the 8th of August, 1820.

In early years he served at the Lowmoor Ironworks as a hammerman; but, about 1840, entered the works of Messrs. Cooper, Field and Hood, Leeds, where he remained until 1857.

He then, in conjunction with his brothers, James and Samuel Taylor, commenced business as manufacturers of best Yorkshire iron, to which was afterwards added the manufacture of crucible cast steel. The house first came into notice in 1860 by making iron that stood the Woolwich test for Armstrong guns. George Taylor distinguished himself particularly in the manufacture of large forgings, such as locomotive crank-axles, for which his firm enjoyed a high reputation. He was one of the earliest, if not actually the first, workman who forged a locomotive double crank-axle from one slab, and his skill in this description of work laid the foundation of his commercial success.

After the death of his two brothers, he continued to carry on the business until the time of his death, which occurred rather suddenly, from the bursting of a blood-vessel, at his residence, Buckingham House, near Leeds, on the 19th of June, 1875.

George Taylor may be regarded as a typical Englishman possessed of great energy of character, perseverance, and industry. He had the wisdom to see what was going to be the demand, and applied his mind to one object-the making of a high quality of iron for railway and other purposes. In this he attained conspicuous success, and was rewarded with opulence.

Stout and robust in physique, and somewhat rough in manner, he conveyed the idea of good common sense and thorough knowledge of his work. Mr. Taylor was much esteemed in Leeds, where he had achieved a high position by means of his ability and enterprise; and shortly before his death his name was added to the list of borough magistrates.

He was elected an Associate of the Institution of Civil Engineers on the 6th of March, 1861, and was a frequent contributor to the Conversazioni of the Presidents, when those gatherings mere held in Great George Street.


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