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George William Higham

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George William Higham (1862-1904)


1904 Obituary [1]

GEORGE WILLIAM HIGHAM was born on the 27th April, 1862, and began his engineering career in 1882 as a pupil of the late R. Hodson, at the Thames Ironworks, Blackwall.

After completing his articles, he remained with the Company as an Assistant Engineer until March, 1892, being employed principally upon the erection of Blackfriars railway bridge and the construction of caisson and lock gates at the Barry Docks.

He worked for a short time in 1892 under Coode, Son and Matthews, and was afterwards employed by Sir John Wolfe Barry, Past- President, on the Tower Bridge works.

In 1893 Mr. Higham joined with Herbert Barry, under the name of Barry and Higham, in consulting and constructional engineering practice.

The partnership was dissolved in 1899, and thereafter Mr. Higham practised in London on his own account as a consulting and inspecting engineer, in which capacity he designed, in addition to other works, a large caisson for Barrow-in-Furness, under instructions from Mr. F. Stileman, and a smaller one for Singapore, under Mr. (now Sir William) Shelford.

He also carried out for Sir John Wolfe Barry an important detailed inspection of the iron and steel work on the Metropolitan District Railway.

In 1901 his health, which had always been delicate, completely broke down, compelling him to give up his practice. He nevertheless retained a keen interest in all matters connected with the profession until his death, which took place on the 21st May, 1904.

Mr. Higham was elected an Associate Member of the Institution on the 10th January, 1888, and was transferred to the class of Memhers on the 5th March, 1901.



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